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LIBRARY OF 

Lasell Seminary 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



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WH.ofesate ^ "Retail 

^. SDOWashingtowSI, f?r 



OF 
30 



Discount to Students of all Principal Educational Institutions. 



Mrs. M. ml Ransom, 

DEALER IN 

JEWELRY, FANS, POCKET-BOOKS, BAGS, 

PICTURE FRAMES, 

CHINA NOVELTIES and UMBRELLAS. 

61 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON. 



BOOKS 



in all Departments of 
Literature - 



Can be found at our store. The largest assortment in 
Boston of the popular and standard authors. We are noted 
for low prices. 

DeWOLFE, FISKE & CO., the Archway Book Store. 

361 and 365 Washington St., Boston. 



FOR. 



STYLISH , 

UP-TO-DATE MILLINERY A T 

MODERATE PRICES, 

CALL ON 

C. LOTHROP HIGGINS, 

7 TEMPLE PLACE. 



Ten Per Cent Discount Allowed. 



(0 



W. H. PRIOR. 



C. A. PRIOR. 



• PRIOR BROTHERS, 

Successors to Wm. Pbior, Jr., & Co. 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in All Kinds of 

Ocean, Lake and River Fish, 

OYSTERS and CLAMS. 



127 and 129 Faneuil Hall Market, 



TELEPHONE, 673 HAYMARKET. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



DREKA 
Fige stationem iM Eiinvhg Bouse. 

1121 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 



COLLEGE INVITATIONS. 
STATIONERY. 

PROGRAMMES. 

BANQUET MENUS. 

FRATERNITY ENGRAVING. 
WEDDING INVITATIONS. 

RECEPTION CARDS. 

MONOGRAMS. 

COATS OF ARMS. 

ADDRESS DIES. 

HERALDRY AND GENEALOGY A SPECIALTY. 
Coats of Arms Painted for Framing. 



When. 



in 
DOUBT 



•«-^^^- 



COSEY 
HOMES. 




744 Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 



LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



FIRST-CLHSS 



j* J> AND J> J> 



Mttm ©ecorafiotts, 

Nos. 38 to 48 Cornhill - - BOSTON. 



< 'X» , iA'\<V , >.»'*,<'\,.' , iA»' , A»'*/M' , ii» , \ii«^ 1 



WM. H. HULL. HORACE W. STICKNEY. UNION B. TWITCHELL 



(2) 



" There is no railroad in 
this country on which high 
speeds can be made with 
more comfort to the trav- 
eller than the LAKE SHORE 
& MICHIGAN SOUTH- 
ERN." — " Railway Master 
Mechanic." 



S07VYE 



,k I have always travelled 
over your road in preference 
to any other, because by 
careful comparison with oth- 
ers, I have found not only 
that the road itself is far su- 
perior to any other, but the 
table and the service are in 
every respect the best of any 
road I have ever travelled 
on." — F. S. Hastings. 






CORNERED 




Send for copy of latest folder, giving full 

information concerning 

train service. 

G. J. GRAMMER, A. J. SMITH, 

Gen. Traffic Manager. Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 





* 






"The 


condition of the 


track 


of the 


LAKE 


SHORE 


ROAD 


is nothing 


less 


than 


superb. 


' — " Railway 


Re- 


view." 


# 







O. K. WILBER, 

Asst. Gen. Pass. Agent, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



T. S. TIMPSON, 

Gen. Eastern Agent, 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 



" The excellent organiza- 
tion and discipline of the 
LAKE SHORE ROAD were 
not less apparent than the 
perfection of the road-bed." 
— Willard A. Smith. 



(3) 



The Photographer to LaselTs, '94, '95, '96, 



WAS 



Charles W* Hearn, 
394 Boylston Street, Boston* 



Special Rates given to Lasell Seminary Students. 



(4) 



COBB, ALDRICH & CO. 

Washington and Kneeland Streets* 



-©©*- 



Situated in the corner of our elegant new store, between the two main entrances, is our 
Confectionery Department, which is one of the largest and handsomest of any in this 
city. This is fully stocked with 

Fresh Confectionery 

of all kinds of the finest French Candies, including Nougatines, Bavarian, St. Nicholas, 

Montevideo, Nanon, Operas, Chocolate-Covered Caramels, Opera Caramels, 

Crystallized French Fruits, etc. Also the more common kinds. 

ALL OF WHICH ARE STRICTLY AJST> ABSOLUTELY PURE, 

and sold at moderate prices. 



The Finest Grocery Store in America* 



-®® — 



COBB, ALDRICH & CO. -. - - BOSTON. 

(5) 



Shreve, Crump & Low Co. 







Give special attention to the designing and execution of 



SOCIETY BADGES, PINS and DEVICES, both in 



Gold and Silver. Designs furnished and estimates sub- 



mitted, on application, free of charge. Also Stationery 



for Class Day and other uses. Prizes in Silver, Gold 



and Bronze, suitable for Class presentation. <£ & ^ 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW CO., Entire Building, cor. Tremont and West Sts. 

THE (^QNNEGTIGUT IV^yTUAL: * % 

* *■ * tife Insurance fio- 



Assets, $62,759,765.95 



Surplus, $7,096,256.43 



THE CONNECTICUT MUTUAL stands by itself and occupies a thoroughly enviable position in life insurance. It was never 
before so strong or so deserving of confidence as it is to-day, and never had more of the public confidence than it has now. 

It offers plain life insurance, as protection to the family, and tries to make it attractive simply by making it perfect to that end 
and by keeping its cost down to the lowest possible point. It tries to realize the ideal results of a legitimate business; and it seeks 
to attract to its membership only those who want only such results, and do not want a speculation on their family's protection. 

The conservative course of the company has brought to it a conservative constituency, and these people are the best risks, for 
they are people who take care of themselves; and they are the best members, for they are stayers. 



JACOB L. GREENE, President. 
JOHN M. TAYLOR, Vice-President. 



EDWARD M. BUNCE, Secretary. 
DANIEL H. WELLS, Actuary. 



GEORGE E. WILLIAMS = = Gen'l Agt., 53 Devonshire St., Boston, Hass. 



(6) 



fye ® Boston ® and ® /flbapy © ^. ^. 



■i 




i 



Has the best through car service from New 



England to the commercial centres of the 



West, and is the only line running through 



cars via 




New York Central & Hudson River R. R., 



Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Ry., 



Big Four Route (C. C. C. & St. L. Ry.), and 



Michigan Central R. R. 



(Passing in full view of Niagara Falls.) 



-Si- 

Trains Vestibuled /GIVING tourists the benefit of a through service without 

-+. . ?(%rh VJT requiring the prepayment of a sufficient sum to cover all 

Complete Through W 4 . /■ f , , . , u , A f - 

r ( expenses contingent on a trip of several weeks or months duration. 

Dining Car bervice. I Passage and berth tickets only being required, all other expenses 
while in transit or sojourning in the West are left discretionary with the traveller, who is thus enabled 
to go and come at pleasure, patronizing such hotels and lines as may best suit his convenience. 

(7) 



Gifts 



Twenty-two of the most Complete Departments, with Up-to-date Goods 
for Weddings, Birthdays, Anniversaries. 

DiailJOIjd D e P ar tlI^CI>t. Solitaire, Twin and Circlet Diamond Rings. 

$25.00, $50.00, $75.00, $100.00. 

Stationery J3epartrqei^t. High-class Stationery from the best makers. 

El>^raVil^g. Card, Society and Wedding Work a Specialty. 



A. STOW ELL & CO., 24 WINTER St., Boston. 



Whitney's, 



Temple Place, Boston 




LADIES' SUMMER WAISTS, WORSTEDS and YARNS. 

LADIES' HANDKERCHIEFS, PINCUSHIONS. 

EMBROIDERY CLOTHS WITH SILK and LINEN FLOSSES. 



~W"e stamp free all goods purchased of* u.s. 

(8) 



EDWARD E. BABB & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



'WW&/&' 



if every deserapta© 




O?ooi «>© 



clfaool Suppli' 



air?d 







25 Arch street 



BOSTON, MASS. 



H(i)\v i(b Ad^fe. 

" I adore thee, my love," he exclaimed, 
" As an ancient — his love of yore," 

But her father appeared and explained 
The modern way to a-door. 



W^at t^e Wild W&ve£ Said. 

Do you hear the ocean moaning, 
Ever moaning soft and low? 

'T is because that fat old bather 
Stepped upon its undertow. 



(9) 



O A. JENKINS & CO. i I i 

LADIES' HATTERS. <***■* 



Q|PECIAL AND UNIQUE STYLES IN ... . 
UNDRESS HATS and ENGLISH TURBANS. 



a 



^ENGLISH WALKING AND SAILOR HATS 



RE FINE IN QUALITY AND PRACTICAL IN STYLE, 
5MLMADE OF SELECTED ENGLISH BRAIDS 



a 



Sole Boston Agents for 407 WASHINGTON STREET, 

Connelly's New York Hats. Boston. 

(10) 



£ 
J 




VOLUME VII 

ALLERLEI, '98. 



LASELL SEMINARY, 

AUBURNDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 

1897. 




1897. 




To fl)e gdc® 



JageU Crtrl.... 





C. Davis, Assistant Editor. 
" Recorder." 



K. DeLong, Assistant Editor. M. Baker, R. Crandall, Business Managers. E. Grant, Assistant Editor. 
" Jester." " Critic" 

D. Aull, Assistant Editor. K. Chapman, Editor-in- Chiej. A. BURNHAM, Assistant Editor. 

(14) 



" Sub." 



TI)e Part vl)icl) Goes P>eforz. 




T is quite the conventional thing to give a book a preface apologetic or otherwise, 
generally the former. The preface is customarily placed like the soup, first, and 
perhaps for the same reason, because it is quite often the lightest. We editorial 
22siissis21 board of the Allerlei realize that we are expected to be modest and humble in our 
preface, that we adorn ourselves with marked humility, that we apologize for having 
said in the volume those things which should not have been said, and for having left unsaid the 
things which should have been said. But, really, we can't do this ; because we don't feel that 
way. If through inadvertence we have omitted any Lasell girl of 1896 from the columns of perti- 
nent personalities, for this we do apologize, for there has been no intention to slight any one. We 
sincerely regret that, out of regard for family embarrassment and lack of space, a few choice bits 
have had to be omitted. These are not forgotten, however. 

As regards the merit of the Allerlei for 1897, a certain modesty, all our own, prevents our 
expressing an opinion. The bear remarked to its offspring one day: "You are a handsome cub," 
whereupon the cub became straightway inflated with pride and called everybody's attention to him- 
self, but only to have it discovered that there was really nothing handsome about him, — which is 
a fable, but not according to y£sop, the moral whereof is that it is a good thing not to be a 
" handsome " bear-cub, nor yet a vain Allerlei. 

We wish to thank sincerely the committee of the faculty for the kindly assistance they have 
rendered us by suggesting corrections, and we wish also to thank all those who have in any way 
contributed to the publication of this book. Finally, we beg of you to be charitable. 

' THE EDITORIAL BOARD. 

(15) 



The '90 Enterprise. 




HE Class of '98 has undertaken a grand and glorious work, one in which every old girl 

ought to be interested. We are determined to raise $25,000 to build a new hall. The 

hall will fill the need for a more commodious chapel, but we will call it our assembly 

room, for it will be used for all entertainments, and will contain stage and dressing 

rooms. Surrounding this room is to be a gallery, lighted by a sky-light, where the Lasell pictures 

are to be hung. The lower part of the building we hope to have fitted up for club and society use. 

The building, together with the land on which it stands, is to be deeded to the Alumnae 

Association when completed. We expect to raise this amount by contributing to it ourselves, and 

also by the liberal contributions of Lasell's loyal daughters and friends ; and we beg you to aid us 

by your enthusiastic support. It is the earnest desire of the Class of '98 to leave this building 

completed when we leave our alma mater, and this can be accomplished if each will give according 

to her means. As you love Lasell, girls, help us in our undertaking. 

Class of '98. 



(16) 




EDWARD LASELL, 

Professor of Chemistry, Williams College. 
FOUNDER OF LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 




CHARLES C. BRAGDON, 
Principal. 




CAROLINE A. CARPENTER, 
Assixtant Principal. 




BLANCHE C. MARTIN, 
Physical Culture. 



5oard of Trastees. 



Rev. Wm. R. Clark, D. D. 

Rev. C. Rarkhurst, D. D. 

Rrof. Jules Luquiens. 
c. c. br ag don. 

Mrs. C. C. Bracdon. 



PacQlf^. 



CHARLES C. BRAGDON, M. A., 

Principal. 



HERBERT L. RICH, Ph. B., 

Natural Sciences. 



CAROLINE A. CARPENTER, 

Assistant Principal. 
English Literature and History. 

JULIA EVANS, M. A., 

Preceptress. 

Manners, Dress. 

GEORGE M. STEELE, D. D., 

Pastor. 

Bible, Ethics, Psychology. 

Civil Government and 

Political Economy. 



ANNIE P. CALL, 
Nerve Training. 

Major GEORGE H. BENYON, 
Military Drill. 

JOSEPH A. HILLS, 

Piano-forte, Theory, Harmony. 

J. WALTER DAVIS, 

Voice Culture, Chorus Singing. 

KATE E. PLUMMER, 

Organ. 



WILLIAM J. ROLFE, A. M , 

Shakespeare. 



S. E. GOLDSTEIN, 
Violin. 



LILIAN M. PACKARD, Ph. B., 

Mathematics. 



NELLIE B. DANFORTH, 

Guitar, Mandolin. 



(22) 



RICHARD ANDREW, 

Drawing, Painting. 



KATE ADAMS, 

Assistant in Gymnasium. 



ADELINE L. ADAMS, 
History of Art. 



ANNA BARROWS, 
Cooking, Demonstrations and Practice. 



ELIZA D. KENDRICK, 

Latin, Greek. 



ANGELINE C. BLAISDELL, 
Book-keeping, Penmanship. 



MARY P. WITHERBEE, 



WILLIAM D. BRIDGE, D. D., 



English. 


Phonography. 


JEANNE LE ROYER, 


EMILY H. GENN, 


French. 


Typewriting. 


PAULA VON DER KALL, 


SUSAN TRUE, 


German. 


Dress -cuttitig. 


; C. MARTIN, 


MARY L. NUTT, 


\ysical Culture, Oratory. 


Nurse. 



MARTHA E. RANSOM, 

Gymnastics and Swimming. 



HENRIETTE GOLDSTEIN, 

Assistant in French. 



(23) 



n^P 



Everyone is as God has made her, and ofttimes a great deal worse. 



*&p 



Senior Class. 



Motto : "Loyal en tout" 
Class Colors : Red and White. Class Flower 

Honorary Member. 
WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS. 

Nora J. Burroughs . . . ■ . 
Gertrude A. Clarke ..... 
Anna P. Warner ... 
Myrtle M. Davis 



Red Carnation. 



Names 

Edith Montgomery Blair 
Gertrude A. Burdsal 
Norah J. Burroughs 
Emeline H. Carlisle 
Gertrude A. Clarke 
Ivah M. Davis . 
Myrtle M. Davis 
Edith A. Dresser 
Lena D. Evans . 
Nellie J. Feagles 
Edith Howe 
Gertrude A. Jones 
Lena M. Josselyn 
Nelle F. Quirk . 
Louise W. Richards 
Kathryn Robertson 
Zella V. Robinson 
Lucia Shumway 
Gertrude Taggart 
Anna P. Warner 
Grace P. Washburn 
Annie M. Weston 
Annie S. Young 



Club. 

Lasellia 
Lasellia 
Lasellia 
Lasellia 
S. D. 
S. D. 
S. D. 
Lasellia 
S. D. 

Lasellia 
Lasellia 
S. D. 
Lasellia 
S. D. 
Lasellia 
S. D. 
Lasellia 
Lasellia 
S. D. 
Lasellia 
Lasellia 
S. D. 



Presi 


dent. 








Vice-President. 


Secretary. 


Treasurer. 


Residence. Room. 


Wyoming, Ohio . . . . . . 41 


Evanston, 111. 








49 


Edwardsville, 111. 








64 


Passaic, N. J. 








3i 


Northampton, Mass. 








Senior Hall 


Topeka, Kansas 








Senior Hall 


Topeka, Kansas 








Senior Hall 


Southbridge, Mass. . 








5 


Fort Worth, Texas 








• 63 


Auburndale, Mass. 




_ 




. 


Passaic, N. J. 








3 1 


Kansas City, Mo. 








62 


Manchester, N. H. 








13 


Minneapolis, Minn. 








5i 


Weymouth, Mass. 








28 


Jacksonville, 111. 








8 


Columbus, Ohio 








5i 


Polo, 111. . 








15 


Indianapolis, Ind. 








35 


Washington, D. C. 








. Senior Hall 


Melrose, Mass. . 








66 


Manchester, N. H. 






13 


St. Louis, Mo. . 








. . 63 



'271 



ninety-seven's Progress- 




S I walked through the wilderness of this world, I lighted on a certain place where was a den, 
and laid me down in that place to sleep ; and as I slept, I dreamed a dream. I dreamed, and 
behold, I saw a maiden standing in a certain place with a book in her hand. I looked, and 
saw her open the book and read therein, and as she read her face was troubled and she wept 
and cried greatly. And as she wept I looked and saw a woman named Teacher coming to 
her, and she asked, "Wherefore dost thou cry?" 

She answered, " Because I perceive by the book in my hand that a time is coming when I shall have 
to go out into the World, and I fear, because I know not how to act." 
Then said Teacher, "Why not study?" 
The maiden answered, "I know not how." 

Then said Teacher, pointing with her finger over a very wide field, "Do you see yonder gate?" 
" No," said the maiden. 

Then said the other, "Do you see yonder shining light?" 
She said, "I think I do." 

Then said Teacher, " Go in that direction and when thou reachest the gate, which is the gate of the 
kingdom of Knowledge, it will be told thee what thou must do in order to prepare for thy sojourn in the cities 
of the World." 

So I saw in my dream that the girl started, quickly at first and gayly, for the way was pleasant and 
easy to her feet ; but presently she drew nigh to a very miry slough that was in the midst of the plain ; and 
being heedless did fall suddenly into the bog. The name of the slough was Latin Grammar. Here, therefore, 
she struggled for a time, striving ever to reach that side of the slough that was nearest the gate. As she 
struggled there came up a man named Tutor and put forth his hand and drew her out of the slough. Then 
went the maiden on with haste, neither spake she to any man by the way, and in process of time she got up 
to the gate. Now over the gate there was written, Lasell Seminary. 

(29) 



The maiden knocked at the gate and presently it was opened by a grave person whose name was 
Entrance Examinations, but he was sometimes called Certificate. This one, when he had opened the gate, 
asked her who she was, whence she came, and what she would have. 

Maiden. — "My name was Preparatory, but I am now called Ninety-seven. I come from the city of 
Ignorance and wish to journey through the kingdom of Knowledge to the cities of the World. I would, therefore, 
sir, since I am informed that by this gate is the way thither, know, if you are willing, if you will let me in." 

Entrance Examinations. — "I am willing with all my heart." 

And with that he let her in ; and after further talk he called to him one named Old-Girl, and bade 
her show Ninety-seven many wonderful things in the house of Classification. Then said Old-Girl, " Come, I will 
show thee that which will be profitable to thee." 

So she led her into a room and bade her open a door ; the which when she had done, Ninety-seven saw 
many maidens sitting on benches in a room, and before them at a table sat a woman with a book in her hand, 
and questioned them from time to time. And the maidens seemed afraid and of a sorrowful countenance. 
Then said Ninety-seven, "What means this, why do they fear?" 

Old-Girl. — " They have spent their days in fooling, and their nights in feasting, and cannot answer the 
questions the woman asks, therefore do they fear. Take heed you do not likewise." 

Then she took her by the hand and led her into a dark room where many maidens sat upon the floor, 
and ate, and ate, and as they ate they trembled. Then said Ninety-seven, " Why is it so dark, how can they 
see to eat, and wherefore do they tremble?" 

Old-Girl. — "This that they do has been forbidden by the Lord of this country. They are in the dark 
because they fear lest they be seen and punished." 

Ninety-seven. — "Why do they do it then?" 

Old-Girl. — "I do not know." 

Then Old- Girl, whose other name was Alumna, took Ninety-seven by the hand and led her forth to the 
way which she must go, and dismissed her on her journey. 

Now I saw in my dream, that the highway up which Ninety-seven went was fenced on either side by 
a wall, and the wall was called Restrictions. Up this highway did the maiden run, sorrowfully at first for she 
was alone ; but at last she came to a beautiful place called Reception-to-New-Girls, and there she met many 
others like her, travelling through the kingdom of Knowledge. These, when they had hailed her, asked her 

(30) 



many questions, whence she came, what was her name, was she a regular or a special. When she had told 
them all these things they took her by the hand and led her with them to the cities of the World. 

Now I saw in my dream that Ninety-seven came to a hill called the hill of Geometry. The hill was 
steep and high, and some of Ninety-seven's companions were afraid, and, stepping back, became specials, and 
were seen no more of her. But Ninety-seven addressed herself to go up, and after much toil and labor came 
to the top. Now, when she was come to the top of the hill there came two running amain. The name of one 
was Fail and that of the other was Flunk, to whom Ninety-seven said, " Friends, what is the matter? You 
run the wrong way." 

Fail answered that they were going to the cities of the World. " But," said she, " the farther we go, 
the more danger we meet with ; wherefore we are turned, and are going back again." 

"Yes," said Flunk, "for just before us lie a couple of lions in the way — English and History — whether 
sleeping or waking we know not ; and we could but think, if we came within reach, that they would presently 
pull us to pieces." 

Now, was Ninety-seven sore afraid, and thought to turn back also, but she took heart and went on, to 
see if peradventure she might find lodging before night-fall. Presently, she lifted up her eyes, and behold, 
there was a very stately palace before her, the name of which was Summer Vacation, and it stood by the 
highway side. 

So I saw in my dream that she made haste and went forward to know if she might get lodging there. 
Now, before she had gone far, she entered into a very narrow passage that led up to the palace, and looking 
carefully before her as she went, she espied two lions in the way. 

"Now," thought she, "I see the danger that Flunk and Fail were driven back by." (The lions were 
chained, but she saw not the chains.) Then was she sore afraid and thought nothing but death was before 
her. But a Sophomore in the palace perceiving that Ninety-seven made a halt, called out to her not to fear, 
for the lions were chained. Then went Ninety-seven on, trembling for fear of the lions; but, though she heard 
them roar, they did her no harm, and finally she came up to the palace, and rested there that night and 
many others. 

When she was fully rested and began to go forward, she descended the hill of Autumn into the valley of 
the Sophomore-year, and there she saw coming towards her a very terrible fiend named Trigonometry. Now 
the monster was hideous to behold; he was clothed in 'sines' and 'cosines,' and they were his pride; he 

(30 



had feet like angles, and a head like a circle ■ and out of his mouth issued a stream of logarithms so that 
the heavens were darkened as he passed. When he came up to Ninety-seven he beheld her with a disdainful 
countenance and thus began to question her. 

Trigonometry. — "Whence came you and whither are you bound?" 

Ninety-seven. — "I am come from the city of Ignorance, and am going through the kingdom of Knowl- 
edge to the cities of the World." 

Trigonometry. — "Prepare thyself to die; for I swear by my 'cosecant' that thou shalt go no farther. 
Here will I spill thy soul." 

Then did Ninety-seven strike out lustily, and after a heavy fight, got the better of the fiend and passed 
on her way rejoicing. 

Now, at the end of this valley was another called the valley of Junior-year ; and Ninety-seven must needs go 
through it, because the way to the cities of the World lay through the midst of it. Now this valley is a very difficult 
place. I saw then, in my dream, so far as the valley reached there was on the right hand a very deep ditch, the ditch 
of Undone-class-work, and on the left hand was a very dangerous quag called Unprepared-lessons, into which, if a girl 
fall, she finds no bottom at all for her foot to stand on. The pathway was also exceedingly narrow, and therefore 
Ninety-seven was hard put to it, for when she sought to shun the ditch on the one hand, she was ready to tip over 
into the mire on the other ; and when she sought to escape the mire, without great carefulness, she would be ready to 
fall into the ditch. 

But she came through safely after much tribulation, and after many other trials not set down in this place, she 
entered into the last stage of her journey, the Senior-year. 

Now must Ninety-seven take heed to her steps, for there was attendant on her journey a cloud of gnats called 
Under-Classmen, who hovered above her thirsting for her blood. Also many giants she met in her path and overthrew 
and came at last in sight of the river of Graduation, on the other side of which were the cities of the World. As 
Ninety-seven stood upon its banks she saw one coming towards her bearing in her hands a cap and gown. These she 
put on Ninety-seven, and above her heart she put for a token a circle of stones, red and white, and within the circle 
was written in letters of gold " L. '97." Then she who had put the robe on Ninety-seven whispered to her a pass- 
word, so that when she reached the cities of the World the watchman might let her in, and the motto was 
" Loyal en tout." 

Then Ninety-seven descended to the river's edge and passed over, and I saw her no more, for I awoke. 

(32) 



«j£ 



" Thd we AT{E young, we scorn to flit on the wings of borrowed wit." 



e^* 













* -I&. 






£%L / fc 



Jcmior Class. 



Class Colors 



Motto : " Oft a rien pour rim." 
Green and White. Class Flowers : White Rose and Maiden Hair Fern. 



Class Yell : Whang I Bang ! Zip ! Boom ! Yite ! 
Hurrah ! Ki- Yi! Green and White J 



Hullabaloo Baloo! Balate ! 
Las ell ! Lasell 7 Ninety- Eight I 



honorary member. 




Emma H. Goll 


• 


• 


President. 












Anna R. Ampt . . . Vice-President. 


^-T~^ 


Kittiebel Chapman . . Secretary. ^ 




Daisy L. Aull . . . Treasurer. \ 




Name. Club. 


Residence. Room. 


Helen G. Abbott ..... Lasellia 


Dexter, Me. . . Annex 4 


Anna R. Ampt 








S. D. . 


Wyoming, Ohio 






2 5 


Milla G. Anderson . 








Lasellia 


Whitewater, Wis. . 








44 


Daisy L. Aull . 








S. D. . 


Kansas City, Mo. . 








39 


Elizabeth C. Allen . 








S. D. . 


Omaha, Neb. 








i8 


Martha A. Baker . 








Lasellia 


Port Antonio, Jamaica 








67 


Alice P. Burnham . 








S. D. . 


Manchester, N. H. 








n 


Ada Cadmus . 








S. D. . 


Jersey City Heights, N. 








33 


Kittiebel Chapman 








Lasellia 


Elgin, 111. . . ". 








36 


Ruth Crandall 








• . ■ 


Auburndale, Mass. . 










Katherine S. DeLong 








S. D. . 


Glens Falls, N. Y. . 








11 


Clara H. Davis 








• • . 


Wyoming, Ohio 








24 


Maud C. Dougherty 








Lasellia 


South Bend, Ind. . 








30 


May W. Emery 








. 


Waltham, Mass. 










Claire E. George 








• . 


Portsmouth, N. H. 






Annex 7 


Emma H. Goll 








S. D. . 


Chicago, 111. . 








34 


Edythe T. Grant 








S. D. . 


New York, N. Y. . 








2 5 


Luella Houghton 








• 


Red Oak, Iowa 








30 


Sophie Hall . 








S. D. . 


Westport, N. Y. 








70 


Mary P. Johnson 








Lasellia 


Manchester, N. H. 








48 


Alice A. Kimball 








Lasellia 


Presque Isle, Me. 








39 


Ruth R. Kimball . 








• • . . 


Clarinda, Iowa 








29 


Jennie Myrick 








Lasellia 


Yarmouthport, Mass. 








32 


Ruth K. Merriam . 








> ■ • • 


Meriden, Conn. 








29 


A. Maude Mayo 








Lasellia 


Foxcroft, Me. 








• 38 


Caroline Poe 








• . 


Findlay, Ohio 








44 


Emma E. Smith 








S. D. . 


Chicago, 111. . 








10 



(35) 



Tf)e Class of '?&. 




UR dreary landing on the Plymouth Rock of Lasell, after farewells to Pa and Ma and 
sighs and tears for dear old home, we now mention only to give prominence to the 
fact that the wilderness we then felt our new situation to be has grown into a garden 
of opportunities and beauties. 
The class of '98 has had its Bunker Hill, Concord, and Lexington, its defeats and victories. 
Now, we are in a position to congratulate ourselves on the fact, that by the encouragement and 
skill of our teachers, conjoined with our own endeavors, we have developed and gained strength 
for honorable achievement and for helpful lives. Our study of philosophy has taught us something 
of the value of the spirit of loyalty to State and city and varying individualities that exist in a 
class composed of members from so many and so diverse sections of the Union. We have 
buried many pet ideas that found no encouragement in minds developed by collision with those of 
our school companions. We have added to our resources a wealth of friendship that will always 
abide in our hearts even to age itself, should Fate allow any of our class to grow old. 

Formidable as appeared the array of studies when we entered the Seminary, by hard work 
and under skilful generalship, we feel now that we have at least entered into the courts of the 
temples of Literature, Science, and Art. Not all of us have reached the hundred per cent mark in 



all lessons, yet, as a class, we have a genuine love for a fair proportion of our studies. None have 

(36) 



proved indifferent or unresponsive to the influence of those delightful hours with Miss Carpenter in 
her English Literature classes, as she led us carefully over the hard places in " In Memoriam " and 
shed light upon the dark places in our Browning pilgrimage. 

Does not the perfection of our accent tell how much we love French? Mademoiselle, in spite 
of her much repeated phrase, " En fran$ais, en francais," has always a word of encouragement for 
the Juniors. We cannot yet boast a Rosa Bonheur among us, but we have many who can paint '98 
in the dearly loved colors, " green and white." Some of us, if not all, have so advanced in Mathe- 
matics as to surprise our parents whose dear hearts we have delighted by our knowledge of Geometry 
and " Trig." Athletics have added to our stature and muscle, and the Junior basket ball team is 
now the pride of the school. Music and Elocution have helped us to sing the praises of our Alma 
Mater. Surely we have musical talent no little among us, for have we not the geniuses of the 
students of organ, piano, and violin splendidly represented? 

We have to climb only one more round in our Lasell ladder before we shall stand where '97 
stands now, only to let our light shine in its own characteristic way, trusting its beams may reach 
with encouragement into the hearts of our Freshman sisters, and assure them that we know from 
experience that from endeavor comes strength, skill, and power. We have worked for the actual 
value there is in mental progress ; and we have tasted the sweets of the consciousness of advance- 
ment and added ability. 

" On a rien pour rien" — 

'Twas this thought^ inspired the Juniors to be upright, strong, and true. 

(37) 



«c£ 



'' O wearisome condition of humanity." 



e^S 







r^ 



5opI)omore Class. 



Motto : " Labor omnia vincet." 



Class Colors : Purple and Gold. Class Flower : Daisy. 



Mildred M. 






President. 




Carita L. Curtis 


. 


Vice-President. 


Carol Maude Case 


. 


| Secretary. 
( Treasurer. 




Name. Club. 


Residence. 




Room. 


Emily A. Bissel ..... 


Rockville, Conn. 




. 4 8 


Carol Maude Case . 






S. D. . 


Highland Park, Conn 








. 28 


Carita L. Curtis 






S. D. . 


Omaha, Neb. 








• 59 


Helen A. Dyer . 






• • ■ 


Auburndale, Mass. 










Mildred M. Faxon . 






S. D. . 


Kansas City, Mo. 








. 62 


Avila F. Grubbs 






Lasellia 


Indianapolis, Ind. 








• 23 


Kathryn Hamlin 






Lasellia 


Minneapolis, Minn. 








. 23 


M. Elisabeth Hunt . 






S. D. . 


K a nsas City, Mo. 








. 60 


Alice Jenks 






Lasellia 


Nyatt, R. I. 








Annex n 


Ethel H. Lasell 






S. D. . 


New York, N. Y. 








. 19 


Mabel C. Marston . 






, , 


Yarmouth, Me. 


. . 






. 27 


Katharine S. Mason . 






Lasellia 


Boom, Iowa 








Annex 5 


Josephine E. Milliken 






Lasellia 


Saco, Me. 








• • • 58 


M. Ethlyn Prentiss . 






S. D. . 


Le Roy, N. Y. . 








Annex to 


Helen Rishell . 






> . • 


Newton, Mass. 










Ruth Rishell . 






• 


Newton, Mass. 








. 


Maritta Y. Sisson 






S. D. . 


Binghamton, N. Y. . 








22 


Elise E. Scott 






> • 


Chestnut Hill, Mass. 










Ethel S. Walton 






• • 


Skowhegan, Me. 








14 


Gertrude S. Watson . 






S. D. . 


Woburn, Mass. 








. 18 



(41) 



History of '99. 




EALIZING in September that our first year had already gone, and that we were now 
Sophomores, we exclaimed with a sigh, half of relief, half of regret, " How quickly 
the year has passed ! " 

But remembering that we were one round nearer the top of the ladder, we felt 
that we could begin to look with scorn upon the emerald pranks of Freshmen, and being inspired 
with the sense of our great responsibility in the world, we resolved to strive to make the wild, 
ambitious dream of the previous year a reality. 

From the first we were few in number, and though several new members have joined us this 
year, yet we still feel keenly the absence of certain of our former companions who left us for fresh 
fields and pastures new. 

We are a class with a diversity of accomplishments ; but though we do not wish to appear 
vain, nor in any way to boast of ourselves, we should like to make use of the opportunity so 
generously afforded us by the superior Juniors, to lead our readers just far enough into the border- 
land of acquaintance with us to convince them that we have among us wise and witty girls, musical 

and literary girls, girls who can speak French, and girls who invariably answer, " Oui, oui, Mademoi- 

(42) 



selle," girls who have their lights out at 9:30, and girls who persist that Lasell should be brilliantly 
illuminated at a late hour, in order to guide the chance traveller on the way to Lee's. 

That desperate struggle, election of class officers, engaged a little of our attention during the 
first week or two of this year, and as a result we have for president Miss F., who conducts the 
meetings in such severely parliamentary order, that we are ground exceeding small by this Mill, 
dread of us all. She knows always the Fax on every subject. Our vice-president is a new acquisi- 
tion this year, and elected to this desirable office because we found her a bright girl and an agree- 
able companion ; but she is no waster of words, I can tell you, and babbiers find to their cost that 
Curt is she. As regards our secretary and treasurer, we are really in very good Case, having an 
officer whom we prize very highly as a guardian for the accumulated wealth of '99. The class- 
historian, accosted by one gone wild on word derivation, with the question, " If a lambkin is a little 
lamb, is a Mill-ikin a little mill?" felt rather aggrieved at first; but, remembering that aberration of 
mind is not uncommon among Preparatories, contented herself with replying, " If a demi-train is 
half a train, is a demagogue half a gog?" The first questioner was removed to an asylum next day- 
She will not recover. 

The list of our class celebrities is not limited to ordinary folk alone, I assure you, but 
contains so ecclesiastically important a person as an Abbott. Yet even this grave make-weight 
failed to keep us decorously sober one morning when Miss P. declared that dead, " like other 
adjectives, could be compared." There 's another of us, however, who Grubbs away so industriously 
at her history, that the other members of the class begin to think that not even the book-covers 
will be left for them. Though the whole class may be detained for an extra session in the English 

(43) 



room, there is one who will always go Scotf-free, for she is invariably correct the first time. A 
Hunt for a Sophomore is one with us. It is a still-hunt, and the game is well worth the chase, 
though shy and wary, and hard to catch. As for E. L., she left her name and some loving friends 
behind her. The sentimental qualities of the class are vested a sacred trust in M. M. If you wish 
to know the reasons for this statement, just ask the girls at the French table. We have among us 
neither stone-cutter nor hod-carrier, but we can claim a most excellent Mason, who comes from the 
wild and woolly West, though you would never imagine this from her appearance, for she is as 
mild as a May-day. Miss D. is not perhaps so tall as the greater number of her classmates, but 
she is still growing, and who knows to what height she may attain, under the Emerson system of 
physical culture? Miss B. distinguished herself as an actress in the German play, and we confidently 
expect her to turn out a second Charlotte Cushman. Though Miss W.'s friends claim that she is 
not passionately fond of work, yet we do not hesitate to assert that she at least knows what work 
is, for she has been known to listen when other girls were talking about it. One of our musical 
girls is Miss W., and judging from the progress that she is now making in this line, we feel sure 
that she will some time be able to compete with Paderewski. Our wise and learned Latin student 
is M. S., and finally let me introduce the wit and pride of the Annex, Miss J., better known as 
" Peggy." 

Although we expect in time to lead humanity out of its present condition to the glorious 
millennium, nevertheless we intend taking the advice of the upper-class-girls, and bearing in mind a 
little longer that we are " only Sophomores." 



(44) 



*£& 



W ho think too little and talk too much." 



*£& 



Pressman Class- 



Motto: IP.(bPOZTNH. 



Class Colors : Crimson and Gold. Class Flower : American Beauty. 



Mabel C. Currie 






President. 






Myra L. Davis 


.... 


..... 


Vice- Presiden t. 




Nelle Robertson 


• • • • 


..... 


Secretary. 




Mabel C. Currie 






Treasurer. 




Name. 


Club. 


Residence. 


Room. 


Rebecca E. Blau 




• • • 


Hyannis, Mass. 










37 


Mabel C. Currie 




. S. D. . 


New York, N. Y. . 










4 r. 


Myra L. Davis . 




. 


Weston, Mass. 










■ 5^ 


Elsie B. Reynolds 




. 


East Haddam, Conn. 










4 


Nelle Robertson 




Lasellia 


Virginia, 111. . 










8: 


Mary L. Sanders 




• • • i 


Southbridge, Mass. 










6 


Helen P. Thomas 




• • 


Taunton, Mass. 










9 


Mary A. Thomas 




. 


Peabody, Mass. 










10 


Ida F. Trowbridge . 




• • • i 


South Framingham, Mass 








76 


lone Tucker .... 




. 


Taylor, Texas 










56 


Elsa B. West .... 




... 


St. Paul, Minn. 










47 



U7) 



History of tl)e "Cl&SS of tl)e Centor^." 



^vwwf^^ jHE brilliant Class of the Century began its career only a few months ago, and as it is 

expected of each class to write its own biography, we find that we must put away for 

a while our characteristic modesty and conform to this time-honored custom, although 

it is an unkind Fate that has thrust this task upon us, which we must endure as best 

we may. To write the history of a baby is like making bricks without straw. 

What has 1900 done? What is she doing? What will she do? One word will answer all 

these questions, and that word is "Nothing," with a big N — ; nothing, that is, which other classes 

set their foolish hearts upon. We do not spend our time playing so simple, childish, and rough a 

game as basket ball, in which so many of the other classes indulge, and the result of which is that 

they go to recitation without even having opened their books once, and stumble through their 

lessons in about the same unskilful manner as that in which they play basket ball. 

Our hearts are set on better things, and it is our glory that the Freshmen are the smartest 

and most studious class at Lasell, a fact demonstrated by the many commendations given us by our 

teachers. The Seniors who think themselves so well instructed and so important are really so very 

small that when compared with the well developed Freshmen, they look very insignificant. To the 

(48) 



members of our class the poor little Preps, who are excluded from all things of honor and 
importance, look up with great respect and reverence, thinking that they will have reached the height 
of their ambition when they can be numbered among the Freshman Class. 

During our career we have had very few difficulties, one of the hardest being our first class 
meeting, when we had so many apparently impossible problems to solve and to solve at once. A 
table was the only thing high enough to serve our noted president as a seat after she had been 
elected. 

This first meeting was one of great importance, as anyone might have seen who looked by 
chance through the window. (This disgraceful thing, we must tell you, some of the inquisitive 
members of the other classes actually did. Of course no such spying was allowable, and the curtain 
was forthwith drawn down, after which, the meeting continued undisturbed. It is surmised that some 
of the Juniors and Sophomores were probably among these on-lookers, as they are often found 
where they do not belong.) 

Our history has, in reality, just begun ; the future is all our own, and we will tell you about 
it in 1900. The Class of the Century is to do great things; we might show the various ways in 
which she even now excels, did not our modesty and the too small space allotted us in this book 
forbid. 



(49; 



*& 



Rather than be less, cared not to be at all." 



*£& 



^Specials. 



Name. 

Margaret Bailey 
Helen W. Beard 
Bessie L. Brainard 
Lillian B. Bright 
Alvena A. Chase 
Eva B. Cole . 
Maria L. Coley 
Clifford B. Dasher 
Beulah DeForest 
Nellie M. Edwards 
Carlotta Elling 
Eva L. Ferris . 
Fannie L. Gibson 
Laura E. Geohegan 
Rena M. Goodwin 
Frances H. Gray 
Nettie L. Greene 
Inez M. Hill . 
A. Ethel Johnson 
Annie B. Keep 
Carolyn M. Kendall 
Flora M. Ketcham 
Clara G. Krome 
Helene K. Little 
Alice M. Littlefield 



Club. 


Residence. 


Room. 


Lasellia 


Marion, Ind. 


40 


. 


Shelton, Conn. 


6 


. 


Thomsonville, Conn. 


54 




Cambridge, Mass . 


56 


Lasellia 


Sandusky, Ohio 


26 


Lasellia 


Bloomington, 111. . 


64 


Lasellia 


New York, N. Y. . 


. 56 


. 


Savannah, Ga. 


26 




Schenectady, N. Y. 


4 




Warren, Penn. 


7 


S. D. . 


Virginia City, Mont. 


Annex 8 


Lasellia 


South Norwalk, Conn. . 


16 


. 


North Conway, N. H. . 


37 


S. D. . 


Wichita, Kan. 


Annex 10 


S. D. . 


Biddeford, Me. . 


. 38 


. 


Mattituck, N. Y. . 


70 


. 


Shrewsbury, Mass. 


27 




Saco, Me. . ... 


Annex 7 




Fall River, Mass. . 


24 


. 


Norwich, Conn. . 


52 




Leominster, Mass. 


54 


Lasellia 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


35 


Lasellia 


Edwardsville, 111. . 


40 


S. D. . 


Glens Falls, N. Y. 


36 


. 


Denver, Col. 


53 



(50 



Specials Continued. 



Name. 






Club. 


Residence. 






Room. 


J. Cecilia Lovell .... 


S. D. . 


Boston, Mass. ... .42 


L. Musette D. Lovell 






. S. D. . 


Boston, Mass. 






42 


Margaret McGavie 






. 


Ottumwa, la. 






Annex 4 


Gertrude L. Moore . 






. S. D. . 


Austin, 111. . 






49 


Antoinette Moss 






Lasellia 


Chicago, 111. 






18 


Edith F. Moulton . 






. 


Salem, Mass. 






7 


Kathryn M. Osgood 






. 


Roxbury, Mass. 






57 


Bertha Parsons 






. 


Salt Lake City, Utah 






37 


Georgia E. Peck 






S. D. . 


Minneapolis, Minn. 






1 


Florence Pooler 






. 


Skovvhegan, Me. . 






14 


Katherine H. Pierce 






Lasellia 


Milford, Me. 






Annex 5 


Edith J. Priddy 






Lasellia 


Findlay, Ohio 






43 


La Verne Reynolds . 






Lasellia 


Brockton, Mass. . 






Annex 4 


Daisy R. Seasongood 






S. D. . 


Cincinnati, Ohio . 






22 


Mary F. Silsbury 






. ■ 


Fall River, Mass. . 






53 


Beulah Smith . 






. 


Roundout, NY.. 






18 


Marion Stafford 






Lasellia 


Fall River, Mass. 






■ • 58 


Miriam B. St. Cyr . 






. 


San Francisco, Cal. 






57 


Grace C. Thomas . 






s . 


Denver, Cal 






47 


Helen T. Turner 






. 


Auburndale, Mass. 








Ephra H. Vogelsang 






Lasellia 


Chicago, 111. 






40 


Alice B. West 




. 


St. Paul, Minn. . 






47 


Elizabeth R. Whitehead S. D. . 


Dorchester, Mass. 






16 


Mary B. White 




. 


S. D. . 


Milroy, Penn. 






70 



(52) 



Preparatory. 



Name. 


Club. 


Residence. 


Room. 


Klara A. Anderson . 


Lasellia 


Whitewater, Wis. 


• 44 


Elizabeth Bolton 




Lansingburg, N. Y. 


• • • 65 


Ella D. Brightman . 




New Bedford, Mass. 


12 


Elizabeth B. Cossar 


Lasellia 


Manchester, N. H. 


12 


I. Blanche Goll 


S. D. . 


Chicago, 111. . 


60 


Florence Harding . 


• 


Mansfield, Mass. 


• • • 5 2 


Miriam Hartshorne 


. 


Methuen, Mass. 


. Annex 6 


Mabel E. Phillips . 


. 


Philadelphia, Penn. 


• 54 


Cora M. Thompson 


. 


Lynn, Mass. . 


. Annex 7 


Mary E. Walker 


Lasellia 


Taunton, Mass. 


9 



(53) 



3n QVlmoriam. 



GRACE PRESTON, M.D., A.M. 

Died, March 20, 1896. 




I 



5- D. Officers. 



President. 
ANNA P. WARNER. 



Secretary. 
MUSETTE D. LOVELL. 



EDYTHE T. GRANT. 



Vice-President. 
GERTRUDE A. CLARKE. 



Executive Committee. 
CLARA STRAW. 



Treasurer. 
CAROL MAUDE CASE. 



MARTHA MOORE. 



Critic. 
KATHERINE S. DeLONG. 



ALICE P. BURNHAM. 



Ushers. 



Honorary Members. 



Miss MARTHA E. RANSOM. 
Miss FLORENCE WELLS. 
Miss ADELINE ALLEN. 
Miss FANNIE PRESTON. 



I. BLANCHE GOLL. 



Miss KATE ADAMS. 
Miss ISABEL SHINN. 
Miss LOUISE PUTNAM. 
Mr. J. WALTER DAVIS. 



(55) 



Aember^ of C3. D. Jociet:^. 



Elizabeth Allen. 
Anna Ampt. 
Daisy Aull. 

Alice Burnham. 
Ada Cadmus. 
Maude Case. 

Gertrude Clarke. 
Mabel Currie. 
Carita Curtis. 
Ivah Davis. 
Myrtle Davis. 

Katherine DeLong. 
Lena Evans. 

Mildred Faxon. 
Marion Gage. 
Emma Goll. 

Blanche Goll. 

Edythe Grant. 

Elisabeth Hunt. 



Lena Josselyn. 
Ethel Lasell. 

Helene Little. 

Cecilia Lovell. 

Musette Lovell. 
Gertrude Moore. 
Martha Moore. 

Ethlyn Prentiss. 
Georgia Peck. 

Louise Richards. 
Zella Robinson. 

Daisy Seasongood. 
Caroline Short. 
Clara Straw. 

Jessica Talbot. 
Gertrude Watson. 
Anna Warner. 
Mary White. 

Elizabeth Whitehead. 



Annie Young. 



(56) 



E)aseUia Gab Officers- 



President. 
NORA BURROUGHS. 

Vice-President. 
KATHRYN ROBERTSON. 



Secretary. 
MARGARET BAILEY. 



Critic. 
EDITH HOWE. 



Business Manager. 
ALICE KIMBALL. 



FLORA KETCHAM. 



Executive Committee. 
MAUDE DAUGHERTY. 



KATHERINE PIERCE. 



NELLE ROBERTSON. 



Guards. 
JOSEPHINE MILLIKEN. 



EPHRA VOGELSANG. 



Honorary Members. 



Miss MARY P. WITHERBEE. 
Mrs. BLANCHE C. MARTIN. 



Mr. JOSEPH A. HILLS. 
Mr. HERBERT L. RICH. 



Mr. RICHARD A. ANDREW. 



(57^ 



Members of Lasellia CtQb. 



Helen Abbott. 

Klara Anderson. 

Milla Anderson. 
Martha Baker. 

Margaret Bailey. 
Gertrude Burdsal. 
Edith Blair. 

Nora Burroughs. 

Emeline Carlisle. 

Kittiebel Chapman 
Alvena Chase. 
Maria Coley. 
Eva Cole. 

Elizabeth Cossar. 

Maude Daugherty. 
Edith Dresser. 
Eva Ferris. 

Kathryn Hamlin. 
Edith Howe. 

Mary Johnson. 



Gertrude Jones. 
Alice Kimball. 

Flora Ketcham. 
Clara Krome. 

Katherine Mason. 
Maude Mayo. 

Josephine Milliken. 
Antoinette Moss. 

Jennie Myrick. 

Katherine Pierce. 
Edith Priddy. 

Nelle Quirk. 

La Verne Reynolds. 

Kathryn Robertson. 
Nelle Robertson. 
Lucia Shumway. 

Marion Stafford. 

Ephra Vogelsang. 
Mary Walker. 

Annie Weston. 

Grace Washburne. 



(58) 



\ 



Lasell Leaves. 



FIRST TERM. 

President, Louise Richards, '97. 
Vice-President, Alice Martin. 
Secretary, Ada Cadmus, '98. 

Editor-in- Chief. 
Emeline Carlisle, '97. 

Associate Editors. 

Gertrude Clarke, '97. Gertrude Jones, '97. 

Annie Young, '97. 

Local Editor. Exchange Editor. 

Edith Howe, '97. Beulah Smith. 

Subscription Agent. Business Manager. 

Katherine Pierce. Lena Evans, '97. 



SECOND TERM. 

President, Edith Howe, '97. 

Vice-President, Gertrude Clarke, '97. 
Secretary, Grace Washburne, '97. 

Editor-in- Chief. 
Louise Richards, '97. 

Associate Editors. 

Katherine De Long, '98. Elizabeth Allen, '98. 

Maude Daugherty, '98. 

Local Editor. Exchange Editor. 

Alice Kimball, '98. Gertrude Jones, '97. 

Subscription Agent. Business Manager. 

Maude Mayo, '98. Lena Evans, '97. 



THIRD TERM. 

President, Maude Mayo, '98. 

Vice-President, Jennie Myrick, '98. Secretary, Ruth Merriam, '98. 

Editor-in-Chief Beulah Smith. Local Editor, Sophie Hall, '98. 

Associate Editors. 
Edith Moulton. Clifford Dasher, '99. Daisy Seasongood. 

Exchange Editor, Claire George. Subscription Agent, Emily Bissell. Business Manager, Lena Evans, '97. 

(59) 



sSfya^espeare Class. 



Helen Abbott. 

Elizabeth Allen. 
Anna Ampt. 
Daisy Aull. 

Martha Baker. 
Edith Blair. 

Anna Brown. 

Gertrude Burdsal. 
Alice Burnham. 
Ada Cadmus. 
Emeline Carlisle. 

Kittiebel Chapman. 
Gertrude Clarke. 
Eva Cole. 

Ruth Crandall. 
Maude Daugherty. 
Ivah Davis. 

Myrtle Davis. 

Beulah DeForest. 

Katherine DeLong. 
Edith Dresser. 



Lecturer .... Dr. W. 

Lena Evans. 

Mildred Faxon. 
Nellie Feagles. 

Claire George. 

Fannie Gibson. 
Emma Goll. 

Edythe Grant. 
Inez Hill. 



Luella Houghton. 
Edith Howe. 
Ethel Johnson. 

Mary Johnson. 

Gertrude Jones. 
Lena Josselyn. 

Carolyn Kendall. 
Alice Kimball. 

Ruth Kimball. 

Clara Krome. 

Helene Little. 

Alice Littlefield. 
Maude Mayo 
(60 



J. ROLFE. 

Ruth Merriam. 

Martha Moore. 

Jennie Myrick. 

Kathryn Osgood. 
Bertha Parsons. 
Georgia Peck. 

Caroline Poe. 
Nelle Quirk. 

Louise Richards. 

Kathryn Robertson. 
Zella Robinson. 

Caroline Short. 

Lucia Shumway. 
Beulah Smith. 

Emma Smith. 
Jessica Talbot. 

Ethel Walton. 

Anna Warner. 

Grace Washburn. 
Annie Weston. 
Elizabeth Whitehead. 
Annie Young. 




_iCJ».V\t*V.i. 



~ ^r — ~ ~ 



I^asell Canoe Clab. 



Captain, Martha E. Ransom. 



President, Emma H. Goli. 



Secretary, Daisy L. Aull. 



Treasurer, Eva L. Ferris. 



Elizabeth C. Allen. 



Lena D. Evans. 



Daisy L. Aull. 



Eva L. Ferris. 



Martha A. Baker. 



Emma H. Goll. 



Ada Cadmus. 



Gertrude A. Jones. 



Kittibel Chapman. 



Zella V. Robinson. 



(63) 



Christian Endeavor. 



President. 
EDITH HOWE. 

Vice-President. 
JOSEPHINE MILLIKEN. 



Secretary, LUELLA HOUGHTON. 



Treasurer, GERTRUDE TAGGAR T. 



ETHEL D. LASELL. 



Lookout Committee. 
BESSIE L. CRAINARD. 



GRACE P. WASHBURN E. 



MARTHA A. BAKER. 



Prayer- /nee ting Committee. 
ANNA P. WARNER. 



KATHERINE S. DeLONG. 



1'empe ranee Committee. 
GERTRUDE A. JONES. 



ANNA R. AMPT. 



Social Committee. 
ELIZABETH B. COSSAR. 



GERTRUDE A. CLARK. 



(64) 



Missionary 5 0C * e ^- 



President. 
EMELINE CARLISLE. 

Vice-Presiden t. 
EDITH HOWE. 



Secretary. 
GERTRUDE TAGGART. 



Treasurer. 
GERTRUDE JONES. 



ANNA AMPT. 



Executive Committee. 
MILDRED FAXON. 



MISS PACKARD. 



Corresponding Secretary. 
MARTHA BAKER. 



(65) 



Orphean Gab. 



Daisy L. Aull. 

Martha A. Baker. 

Rebecca E. Blau. 

Nora J. Burroughs. 

Emeline H. Carlisle. 
Maude Carol Case. 

Gertrude A. Clarke. 
Eva B. Cole. 

Myra L. Davis. 

Nellie J. Feagles. 

Kathryn M. Osgood. 
Bertha Parsons. 

Georgia E. Peck. 

Katherine H. Pierce. 
Mary B. White. 
Mr. Davis .... Leader. Mrs. Harris 



Laura E. Goehegan. 
I. Blanche Goll. 
Emma H. Goll. 

Rena M. Goodwin. 
Nettie L. Green. 
Kathryn Hamlin. 

Alice A. Kimball. 
Helene K. Little. 

J. Cecilia Lovell. 

Mabel C. Marston. 



Accompanist. 



(66) 



InsfraiDenfal Paptls. 



Violin. 



ELIZABETH C. ALLEN. 
ADA CADMUS. 

CARLOTTA ELLING. 

FLORENCE HARDING. 



MIRIAM HARTSHORNE. 

J. CECILIA LOVELL. 

CORA M. THOMPSON. 
ELSA B. WEST. 



Organ. 



Mandolin. 



MARTHA A. BAKER. 

NELLE ROBERTSON. 



LUELLA HOUGHTON. 

HELEN P. THOMAS. 



Guitar. 



ANNA P. WARNER. 



(67) 




Lasell Insframental Gab. 



Director . 
Helen Abbott. 

Elizabeth Allen. 

Klara Anderson. 

Margaret Bailey. 
Martha Baker. 
Emily Bissell. 
Lillian Bright. 
Ella Brightman. 
Ada Cadmus. 
Maude Case. 
Mabel Currie. 
Carita Curtis. 

Clifford Dasher. 
Myra Davis. 

Maude Dougherty. 
May Emery. 
Eva Ferris. 



Clare George. 

S. E. Goldstein. 

Florence Harding. 

Miriam Hartshorne. 
Luella Houghton. 
Edith Howe. 
Elisabeth Hunt. 
Alice Jenckes. 
Ethel Johnson. 
Ruth Kimball. 
Clara Krome. 

Jeanne LeRoyer. 
J. Cecilia Lovell. 
Gertrude Moore. 
Mabel Phillips. 
Caroline Poe. 
Florence Pooler. 
(68; 



Prof. Joseph A. Hills. 
LaVerne Reynolds. 
Helen Rishell. 
Ruth Rishell. 

Nelle Robertson. 
Elise Scott. 
Marion Stafford. 
Jessica Talbot. 
Cora Thompson. 
Ephra Vogelsang. 
Ethel Walton. 
Anna Warner. 
Grace Washburne. 
Gertrude Watson. 
Annie Weston. 
Elsa West. 

Elizabeth Whitehead. 





GERTRUDE A. JONES, Captain. 



EMMA H. GOLL, Captain. 



Drill 



COMPANY A. 
Captain, GERTRUDE A. JONES. Lieutenant, ANNA P. WARNER. 



Sergeants. 



Corporals. 
EDYTHE T. GRANT. 

LUELLA HOUGHTON. 

IVAH M, DAVIS. 



Captain, EMMA H. GOLL. 



First, ELISE E. SCOTT. 

Second, LOUISE W. RICHARDS. 

Third, EDITH HOWE. 

COMPANY B. 

Lieutenant, GERTRUDE A. CLARK. 

Corporals. 
First, ALICE A. KIMBALL. DAISY L. AULL. 

Second, NORA J. BURROUGHS. CAROL MAUDE CASE. 

Third, KATHARINE H. PIERCE. J. CECILIA LOVELL. 

(69) 



Sergeants. 




^^Cra^TiX-J^ *% 



Cooking. 



MARTHA BAKER. 



GERTRUDE CLARKE. 



NORA BURROUGHS. 



NELLIE FEAGLES. 



EMELINE CARLISLE. 



KITTIEBEL CHAPMAN. 



GERTRUDE JONES. 
RUTH MERRIAM. 



GRACE WASHBURNE. 



EMMA GOLL. 



EDITH HOWE. 



RUTH KIMBALL. 
ANNA WARNER. 



(7i) 



5vimming. 



REBECCA E. BLAU. 



CAROLYN M. KENDALL. 



ELIZABETH B. COSSAR. 



CLIFFORD B. DASHER. 



CLARA H. DAVIS. 



CLARA G. KROME. 



HELENE K. LITTLE. 



MARTHA MOORE. 



KATHERINE S. DeLONG. 



CLAIRE GEORGE. 



I. BLANCHE GOLL. 



FRANCES H. GRAY. 



MABEL E. PHILLIPS. 



NELLE ROBERTSON. 



ETHEL S. WALTON. 



GERTRUDE S. WATSON. 



KATHRYN HAMLIN. 



PI)YSical Oltare. 



I. BLANCHE GOLL. 



MARTHA MOORE. 



ALICE JENCKES. 

ALICE A. KIMBALL. 



MARITTA Y. SISSON. 



NELLIE L FEAGLES. 



(72) 



sSfadio. 



ANNA R. AMPT. 

MILLA G. ANDERSON. 

INEZ M. HILL. 
CAROLYN M. KENDALL. 

A. MAUDE MAYO. 

IONE TUCKER. 



(73) 




C.^George. 



A. Cadmus. 


E. Goll. 


M. Mayo. 




A. Ampt. 


A. Kimball, 


S. Hall. 




E. Allen. 


Cap/. 


D. Aull. 


M. Emery 



(74) 



Sas^et Ball Teams. 

-%< 

'98. '99. 

A. A. Kimball {Captain) . . . Centre ...... B. Blau 

C. Poe ) ( M. Faxon 

> ..... Centre Guards .....< 

E. Allen ) ( H. Rishell 

C. George ) _ _ ( M. Case 

. Goal Guards ..... \ 

D. Aull ) ( C. Curtis 

A. Ampt . . .... Goal Thrower . . . . E. Hunt ( Captain) 

S. Hall ...... Goal Defender . . . . . . E. Scott 

Substitutes. Substitutes. 

R. Kimball. E. Goll. M. Mayo. E. Moulton. G. Watson. 

M. Emery. A. Cadmus. A. Jenks. 

3pecials;. 

C. Elling .............. Centre 

E. Blair ) 

\ .......... . Centre Guards 

E. Ferris ( Captain) ) 

M. Gage ) 

\ ............ . Goal Guards 

E. West ) 

M. McGavie Goal Thrower 

M. Currie ............. Goal Defender 

Substitutes. 

K. Pierce. M. Coley. C. Dasher. 

I. Hill. N. Robertson. F. Ketcham. 

(75) 



£. D. Banquet 

JUNE 3, 1896. 



Toastmistress, Miss CLARKE. 

President's Address, Miss GOLL. 

Lasellia Club, Miss EVANS. 

Response, Miss SAWIN. 

Our Fraternity Brothers, Miss DAVIS. 

Alma Mater, Miss McDOWELL. 



(76) 



I^asellia P,anq,ttet, 



JUNE 5, 1896. 



toastm i stress 
President's Welcome 
Senior Class 



Miss Burroughs.. 
Miss Chapman- 
Miss Kelley- 



" To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die." 

The Fuiure Miss Wilson. 

" O, wonderful, wonderful, and most wonderful wonderful ! and yet again wonderful, and after that out of all whooping." 



The S. D. Society 



Our Honorary Members 



Poem 



Miss Griswold. 



" Praising what is lost 
Makes the remembrance dear.' 



" To what a height has fortune raised us up." 

" What is the connection of thought." 

Committee of Arrangement. 
Miss Kimball. 



Miss Schuberth. 



Miss Witherbee. 



Miss Carlisle. 



Miss Parish. 



(77) 



O&ss Nigf)t, 



JUNE 8, 1896. 



Class Song. 



President's Address 

Introduction 

Le Rossignol (Liszt) . 

What the years have brought 

East versus West 



Mary B. Cruikshank. 

Ella F. Ampt. 
Crusoe Summary of '96 
As seen through a glass darkly 



Lestra M. Hibberd. 
Second Mandolins. 

Grace P. Englehart, 
Ella W. Wilson. 

Last Will and Testament . 
Goodbye .... 



Blanche Linwood Kelley. 

Josephine Beatrice Chandler. 

Lestra Morrison Hibberd. 

Florence Alice Ray. 

Helen May Holman, Ella Fredonia Ampt. 



Sextette. 
Cara A. Sawin. 



Kate S. Pennell. 



Blanche L. Kelley. 



Oration 

Presentation 
Bur ming of Effigy 



a. Oriental Echoes. 
b. Manzanillo. 
First Mandolins. 



OUT-DOOR EXERCISES. 



Ella W. Wilson. 

Alice Williams Clarke. 

Cara Angenette Sawin. 



Helen M. Holman. 

Guitars. 
Kate S. Pennell. 
Isabel E. Bronson. 



Ella W. Wilson. 
Louise P. Hubbard. 



Annie Jean Hackett. 

Julia Tulleys. 

Kate S. Pennell. 



(78) 



^Yafrimontal Oat>. 



President . 
Secretary . 
Treasurer . 
Executive Committee 



Anna Poe Brown. 

Anna P. Brown. 

A. Poe Brown. 

A. P. Brown. 



Anna. 



Katherine H. Pierce. 



Helene K. Little. 



Membership Roll. 
Poe. 

Honorary Members. 

Candidates for Membership. 

Nora J. Burroughs. 

Gertrude A. Jones. 



Brown. 



Antoinette IVkss. 



Ione Tucker. 



(79) 



Ctobs Cannot Part Tf)er». 



GERTRUDE DAISY 




ZELLA 


and and 




and 


MILDRED. JENNIE. 




NELLE 


DAISY KITTIEBEL 




EDITH 


and and 




and 


ALICE. HEL£NE. 




ANNA. 


NAN 


EVA 




and 


and 




LENA. 


BESSIE. 





Ctabs Cannot Join Tf)em. 



HE 


ELIZABETH 


ALICE 


and 


and 


and 


IVAH. 


ETHEL. 


ANTOINETTE 


ADA 


EDITH 


MILDRED 


and 


and 


and 


MYRTLE. 


NORRINE. 


MARTHA. 


EDITH 




CECILE 


and 




and 


EDITH. 




ANNIE. 



(80) 



Actction ! ! ! 



LASELL GIRLS MAKE GREAT SACRIFICE FOR THE HEATHEN. 

$2,500 worth of Goods to be sold at a 



GREAT REDUCTION. 



FEBRUARY 3i, 



62 Old-Clo' -A-lle^ 



i Worth Gown, 
i Duck Vest. 

i Pair White Satin Slippers, 
i Pair Golf Stockings, 
i Oriental Costume. 

y% doz. Silk Waists. 



LISO? OP AETIGLBS TO IBIE SOLD. 

i 19th Century Suit. 



1 Spring Hat. 

1 Lawn Dress. 
1 Sweater. 

1 Pair Patent Leather Slippers. 
1 Princeton Flag. 



Many other costly Antiquities. Terms strictly CASH. 



Agricultural Products not taken in Exchange. 



(81) 



Detftscf)es Theater. 

MONTAG, DEN 27 JANUAR, 1897. 



DIE ALTE ZPZE^ZETJ-HSFDIZN" 

LUSTSPIEL IN FUNF AUFZUGEN 

von 

Sophie von Adelung. 

Ort der Handlung : teils eine kleine Stadt, teils die Residenzstadt des Landes. 



Personen. 
FRAULEIN STEIN . 
LOUISE BONCOEUR . 
HEDWIG STRAHLEN 
GRETCHEN SCHONAN 
AGNES 
CHARLOTTE 
ELLA . 
KATHCHEN 
LILLI . 
AENNY 
KLARA 
ELSPETH . 
VALERIE . 
IDA 

RUDOLF BARTENSTEIN, Dr. phil. Verlagsbuchhandler 
FRANZ BERGER, Buchhalter bei Bartenstein 
DIENERIN 



Fraulein Blau. 

Fraulein Shumway. 

Fraulein De Forest. 

Fraulein Burdsal. 

Fraulein Blair. 

Fraulein Carlisle. 

Fraulein Young. 

Fraulein Goll. 

Fraulein Seasongood. 

Fraulein Curtis. 

Fraulein Scott. 

Fraulein Howe. 

Fraulein Washburn. 

Fraulein Silsbury. 

Fraulein Burroughs. 

Fraulein Clarke. 

Fraulein West. 



(82) 



E)a Demoiselle a Marier. 

Par Schribe et Melesville. 

Representee par la Classe '97. 
LE 21 NOVEMBRE, 1896. 



Acte I. Le Refus. 



Acte II. La Demande. 



La scene se passe en province dans la maison de M. Dumesnil. 



Personages 



M. DUMESNIL 

MADAME DUMESNIL 

CAMILLE, leur fille 

ALPHONSE De LUCEVAL, pretendu de Camille 
DUCOUDRAI, ami de M. Dumesnil . 
BAPTISTE, domestique de M. Dumesnil 

Chanson, composee par Mlle. Young. 



Mlle. Alice West. 

Mlle. Elizabeth Dike. 

Mlle. Grace Washburn. 

Mlle. Edith Blair. 

Mlle. Anna Warner. 

Mlle. Lena Evans. 



(83) 



a 



SHAKESPEARE'S MERRIEST COMEDY, 

A MIDSUMMER NIGHTS DREAM/' 

RECITAL BY 

MRS. HANNIBAL A. WILLIAMS, 

OF NEW YORK. 

Nltasio by MENDELSSOHN, 
Rendered by members of Lasell Instrumental Club, 

Misses BAKER, GEOHEGAN, PIERCE, and CLASS CHORUS, 

Under the direction of Mr. JOSEPH A. HILLS and Mr. J. WALTER DAVIS. 
MRS. HARRIS, Accompanist. 



Class of '97, Lasell Seminary, 

Monday, March 15, 1897, 8 o'clock. 

(8 4 ) 



Mov We Long for ^Senior Privileges. 



I want to be a Senior 
And with the Seniors sit, 

To study " Psych " and Logic, 
And be well versed in "Lit." 



II. 

I want to go to Boston, 

Have callers Saturday night, 

I want that Senior dignity, 
Also that Senior height. 



III. 
And when I am a Senior 

I '11 make the Juniors see 
That they'll have to treat in Boston, 

Or they won't go in with me. 



IV. 

And long before I graduate, 

My " supe " will know her work, 

She '11 make my bed and sweep my room, 
And if she tries to shirk, 



And does n't see how honored she 
Has been by favoring Fate, 

She '11 learn she cannot trifle with 
THE CLASS OF '98. 



(»S) 



TI)e Masquerade. 




ALLOWE'EN night at old Lasell, 
All were gathered in the Gym., 
Girls galore of every sort, — 

Light and dark, tall, short, and slim. 

The Seniors gave a masquerade 
To the other classes four, — 

Junior, Freshman, little Preps., 
And the great class, Sophomore. 



A dainty Violet was there, 

Also a bridegroom with his bride, 
And many a loving glance gave he, 

At this houri by his side. 

Tall Liberty, majestic, fair, 

Clad in her dear red, white, and blue ; 
And two were dressed as Autumn leaves 

In foliage of October's hue. 

Little Boy Blue did blow his horn, 
And a pale Nun, with downcast eyes, 

Went deep in thought the crowd among, 
All heedless of the Baby's cries. 

(86) 



The ballet girls in silk and gauze, 

They danced and flirted, — yes, and smiled ; 

And by their artless coquetries 

They man)' a foolish youth beguiled. 

Aunt Topsy, in her turban red, 

Gave impish looks and cute replies; 

While the Daughter of the Regiment 
Looked on the scene with fearless eyes. 

A Harvard football man in red 
Scowled at a rival Yale in blue ; 

And in the midst of all this rout 
A sweet and simple Daisy grew. 



But best of all was Li Hung Chang, 

Who mystified us twice and thrice ; 
Oh, a Celestial born was he, 

Straight from the land of queues and rice. 

The Christmas tree with sweets and toys, 
Gave to those present, one and all 

A gift to serve to call to mind, 
In after days, the Seniors' Ball. 

'99- 



(87) 



Senior statistics. 



NAME. 


Position in 

Glass. 


Favorite 
Amusement. 


Ideal. 


Minus. 


Aim in Life. 


Pet Expression. 


Notorious for 


Will be 




Doing Boston. 


Marie. 


Marie. 


# 
CO 
CO 

H 

M 
CO 

b 

M 

m 
o 

M 

& 

1-9 

H 

O 

PQ 

< 

H 
P 
O 

P 

M 
& 

o 


Get under the 
table. 


Daring deeds. 


Old maid. 




Skeleton. 


Dreaming. 


Berlin. 


Haste. 


When. — 


Her first room- 
mate. 


Fraulein. 




President. 


Callers. 


Cliff dwellers. 


Time. 


In the name of 

common dickies. 


Rushing. 


A free silver 
Hanna. 




Historian. 


Defending the 
Green. 


St. Patrick. 


The Brogue. 


Be gorra. 


Patriotism. 


A matron at 
Castle Garden. 




Secretary. 


Running for 
Trains. 


A land of 
leisure. 


Energy. 


Not guilty ! 


Coiffure. 


A second Patti. 




Dramatist. 


Studying. 


Tom. 


New Gown. 


Yes? 


Falling off a 
chair. 


A deaconess. 




Letter writer. 


Writing letters. 


An Eastern 
Fiance. 


Red Hair. 


All slang. 


Latest songs. 


A French 
teacher. 




Flirting. 


Regular Senior. 


Something to 
say. 


He! he! 


Quietness. 


Alumna some 
day. 




Mathematician. 


Shirking work. 


Euclid. 


Curls. 


! 


Digging. 


A mathemati- 
cian. 




Songstress. 


Athletics. 


Mrs. Martin. 


A smile. 


Nobody knows. 


Her Lasell 
home. 


Somebody's 
little Nell. 




Sage. 


Visiting 32. 


Class President. 


Voice. 


How? 


Her playing. 


A star. 




Favorite. 


Teasing M-ldr-d 


M-ldr-d. 


Virginia. 


Simply tacky. 


Company A. 


An art student 
in New York. 




Prettiest girl. 


Fishing. 


Any old thing. 


Callers (?). 


Gee! 


Her dimples. 


A society belle. 


Quirke 


Novelty. 


Hunting Dr. 
Steele. 


Smith College. 


Cheek. 


Say! 


Chasing. 


Twenty. 




Writing 
Editorials. 


An editor. 


Work. 


Gee-whiz. 


Disposition. 


Editor's wife. 




Fashion plate. 


Enjoying life. 


Banker. 


Nickname. 


Oh! isn't it 
go-o-ey? 


Her brother. 


Wife of a 
banker. 




Photographer. 


Rushing. 


Latest strike. 


Selfishness. 


I. 


For herself. 


Artist, perhaps. 




Prodigal. 


Dancing. 


Lasell graduate. 


Temper. 


'97. 


Her return. 


Good. 


Taggart 


Greek student. 


Collecting Mis- 
sionary Dues. 


Miss Carpenter. 


Nothing. 


Oh, yes ! 


Information. 


Missionary. 




Artist. Guitar. 


C. D. Gibson. 


Mathematical 
Ability. 


Can't do it to 
save my life. 


Room-mates. 


Nuisance. 




Baby. 


Making chicken 
salad. 


Room-mate. 


Age. 


Oh, how horrid ! 


Voice. 


Actress. 




Musician. 


Growing. 


Paderewski. 


Height. 


How senseless. 


Musical talent. 


Doctor's wife. 




Poet. 


Writing poetry. 

1 


Chaucer. 


Publisher. 


Lee-na. 


Poems. 


Composer of 
Lasell song. 



* Unaccomplished. 



C88) 



granger Things Have Happened. 




HE sat in an old-fashioned chair in a beautiful room filled with old-fashioned things. She was 
about twenty-five years old, — old enough to have secured a college parchment, to have travelled 
a bit, to have gotten into the habit of doing things for herself, and to have resisted matrimony 
long enough to be characterized in this world, which coins expressions with the ticking of the 
clock, as a bachelor girl. And now this was all over, and the four years of college and hurried 
glimpses of other people and places, and the winters in society, and the men she had met, — and the men she 
might have married, — were mingled in the pot-pourri of the past. 

It was the last night of the year; the night when an old year dies, and a new one is born, and when 
good resolutions are made — usually, might be added, only to be broken. It is, perhaps, an occasion when, if 
people stop at all to think, they think seriously. And that is what the girl was doing. She had not had time 
to do so before. The years of her pleasures and of her triumphs had drifted by. She, like most girls, accepted 
as her conventional right the homage and the admiration which the world had paid her. And now she was 
twenty-five, and on the night before, her father as he softly kissed her forehead had said : " Good night, my 
Molly, you 're twenty-five ; and I don't suppose Dad can keep you much longer." 

She sat on this last night of the dying year, idly reading before the fire, a book she had carelessly 
picked up, entitled " Modern Proverbs," but which, perhaps, would have been better called " Cynicisms." And 
opening it at random she read the following : " It has been said that married women live longer than single 
women, but if the truth be accurately told, it should be rather said that it seems longer." And as she read this 
she smiled and said to herself, "A not unclever thrust at a respectable institution." She thought a moment; 
" Yet I do not know but that I am, perhaps, as cynical as the author. Why should a woman marry ? Why 
should agreeable freedom be tossed away for the cares, the vexations, of married life?" She leaned back and 
glanced into the coals. Five, ten minutes passed and then she looked up. " It is a good time to make 

(89) 



resolutions," she softly said ; "I believe when the bell rings to-night the advent of a new year, I will make a 
resolution never to marry." 

Smiling she rose, and a big mirror, catching the reflection, smiled back at her. Just then the maid 
softly rapped. " Come," said the girl. The maid entered. She handed her mistress a card, on which was 
engraved, " Mr. John Bigelow Houghton." From his seat high up in the corner the cuckoo clock softly remarked 
that it was eleven ; and the girl glancing at the saucy mentor, said : " Yes, I agree with you, it is bad form." 
And then she turned to her maid and said : " Tell Mr. Houghton I will see him here," whereupon the cuckoo 
clock gasped, and the maid looked horrified ; but the girl's word was law. 

A few moments later the portieres swung back and Mr. Houghton was announced. " Good evening, 
Jack," and the girl stretched out her hand. "I know this is unconventional," she continued, "but they say I 
do unconventional things." She motioned him to a seat beside her. " The same old errand, I suppose, Jack,'' 
she continued. He gravely nodded. "Yes," said the girl thoughtfully, "it's the thirty-first of December. Let 
me see, Jack, it's how many years now since — " "Four," remarked the man. "It's not good manners to 
interrupt," said the girl with a frown, " but I think you are, nevertheless, right." She paused and thought a 
moment. " Yes ; it is four since you first began coming to see me with the regularity of the calendar, and in 
accordance with your resolution, on each thirty-first of December to ask me to marry you. Jack, how much 
longer do you intend keeping it up?" The young man slowly replied, "You ask a hard question." 

"Have you any arguments to use to-night different, say, from those of last year? " imperiously asked 
the girl. " No, nothing ; unless it be that I am a year older, and hence possibly wiser, and therefore 
presumably more valuable." And he smiled at the coals. " And, you might have added, probably a year more 
of a sinner, I suppose, too," she demurely suggested. " I suppose so," was the answer. 

There was silence for a few moments. " You are quieter than usual on this anniversary night, Jack ; is 
it resignation or — well, cooled ardor?" There was no reply. The girl glanced at him a little anxiously. 
Then she quietly said : " I have come to the conclusion that it is not right longer to allow you to care for me, 
Jack, hoping against hope, as you have been doing for years, thinking, perhaps, that each succeeding twelve- 
month might see me changed." She leaned forward and studied the coals. " If it came to marrying, Jack, I 
would as soon marry you as any man I ever met. I 've known you all my life. You trundled me about, you, 
a mature young man of seven, when first I adopted a baby carriage. We grew up in neighboring homes, and 

(90) 



when you went away to college, I pretty nearly cried my eyes out, they say ; and when I got to be twenty-one, 
you came around, — I really don't think because of past relations, — and asked me to marry you. You 've 
kept doing it ever since, and it 's been nice of you, Jack, and I appreciate it ; but — " she stopped a moment 
as if to let the man measure the full force of the words, " but, I 've made a resolution to-night, never to marry, 
and — "she hesitated and looked at her listener, "and this must be final." 

He said nothing. It was inexplicable to the girl. There was none of the usual entreaty, the pleading, — 
only silence. She reached forward and lightly touched him on the shoulder. " You heard me, Jack ; this must 
be final?" "Yes, I heard you," he said in an absent sort of way, "and I'm rather glad to hear it." The 
girl started. He leaned back in his chair. "You see, Molly, it's like this; I did come here to-night, as I've 
done for three years, to ask you to marry me, — knowing, however, you wouldn't accept me." He paused a 
moment, " But I came on another errand, also. The fact is, this is my last appearance in this role, and now 
as you have said so plainly what you have, — the curtain rung down, as it were, and the personal element removed, 
— it will make it much easier for you to advise me." The girl looked nonplussed and a little troubled 
but the man did not appear to notice it. He said nothing for a few moments, and then thoughtfully drew a 
letter from his pocket. He removed the enclosure from the big, blue envelope, and with it a second sheet, 
old and creased as from many foldings. Then he said, "Molly, I want to read you this letter: 'Nice, France, 

Dec. 30th, 1896. Dear Mr. , Eight years ago when you were twenty-three years old, you asked me to 

marry you. I told you I could not. The reasons I gave, you perhaps recollect ; anyway they 're uninteresting 
and probably childish. Then I went away. I have not seen you since. You followed me by letters for six 
months, and finally wrote me one last letter in which you said (and which I enclose), "If at any time you 
ever change your mind, and can decide to accept me, please let me know. Yours, Jack." Though I have 
never heard from you, I have heard about you, and I have watched you. Eight years change things and 
people. If you are still heart free and feel as you did then — briefly, I accept your offer. Time has taught 
me what, eight years ago, I could not believe. Most sincerely, Madge Brooks.' " 

The man slowly refolded the letter and replaced it in his pocket, thoughtfully looked at the girl, and 
then pensively back at the fire again. The girl had grown a little pale, but he did not seem to notice her. 
He meditated a moment, and then said quietly, " That 's what I wanted to ask you about, Molly. You see 
it's like this: I can't marry you," and he looked up with a good deal of pathos in his manly eyes, "because 

(90 



you won't let me. You have heard the letter from Miss Brooks, whom you do not know and have never seen. 
I will only say to you that she is a fine girl. It is evident that the years have changed her." He paused a 
moment, and then went on, " You have refused me, finally. Miss Brooks has wandered about the world, the 
years have come and gone, and she has apparently tired of it all." The man shook his head and thoughtfully 
added. " And I guess I have, also. Madge would make me a good wife, and, Molly, I want to get married." 
Here a little shadow of the old pleading look came into his eyes, but turning his head away, he concluded, 
" I guess I '11 write her and tell her that I accept the offer." 

The minutes ticked themselves away forever, and neither spoke. But finally the man said : " Well, Molly, I 
came here for advice." But there was no response. He glanced at her. She was watching him with a sad little 
expression on her face, and with something more than a suspicion of moisture in her eyes. At his glance she rose to 
her feet and looked down at him ; then, though for some reason it was hard for her, she finally managed to say, " Of 
course, Jack, I — I think — you should do just what — what — you have decided is for the best." Someway she 
could n't say any more, and just then the cuckoo clock struck twelve. He rose and reached for his coat, " Molly, it 's 
twelve, and though I suppose that resolution is now irrevocable, — won't you marry me?" It was like a little tableau, 
or a scene on the stage, only this time it was the real thing. She stood opposite him, pale and calm. He looked 
resigned, but scarcely content. There were no smiles, as thus they stood facing each other. At last she stirred 
slightly, and looking him full in the face softly remarked, " I guess, Jack, I will retract that resolution." And the 
drama of life has ended. 

And as John Bigelow Houghton walked down the deserted street on that early New Year's morning, he drew a 
big blue envelope from his pocket, and stopping, deliberately tore it into little bits. As he did so a night messenger 
boy passing by heard him mutter, " It was mean, I know, but I couldn't wait forever for her to make up her mind, 
dear girl." He lit a cigar as he stood there, and mused thus to himself, " I wonder who Madge Brooks was, anyway. 
It was a queer experience. It was awfully nice, though, in Jack Fairbanks to give me that old letter." And then 
without a disturbing thought to weigh down the place where his conscience ought to have been Jack Houghton went 
home and to bed. 

There is a tradition that anything is fair in war — and love. There is also a tradition that a man can never 
circumvent a woman in an affair of the heart. The last is only a tradition. 

(92) 



Pebraar^ 15. 



1. 

The night was clear, the weather cold, 
And all Las ell, both young and old, 

Had started out for fun. 
In seven sleighs they huddled tight, 
Unmindful of Jack Frost's sharp bite 

And snow balls by the ton. 



II. 

And all the way to town, their cheers 
Rang loud in cultured Boston ears, 

Class yells and barge yells, too. 
Then home they jingled through the gloom, 
And starving, sought the dining room 

Where steamed a savory oyster stew. 
L' Envoi. 

Our tale is done, our fun is through, 
And thanks to C. C B. are due. 



Election FJigfjt 



Election night, — 
Candles bright ; 
Great fight 
With a Bryanite. 
Teachers blight 
Girls' delight, — 
Good-night ! 



Tt)e Caller's Wail. 



Missed the train, 

Next was late. 
Snow and rain, 

Such is fate ! 
Saw my Jen, — 

The cold shoulder ; 
Home again, 

Wiser, older. 



(93) 



TI)e sStamp 5orrower. 




NE Sunday evening, dark and cold, 
I sat within my room ; 
A nicker from the feeble light 
Alone lit up the gloom. 

As then I sat and mused and dreamed, 
My thoughts were with dear Tom, 

With a bang at the door, a girl rushed in, 
As if shot from a dynamite bomb. 



" Now, Mabel, have you any stamps ? 
Last night I had ten or twenty, 
But I don't know where they all have gone, — 
Give me four; that will be plenty." 

Sadly I sighed, and musing turned 
From the sweet dream just begun ; 

" Six girls have been in here for stamps, 
And you 're the seventh one. 



" I had two two-cent stamps this noon, 
But gave them both away. 
Is there anything else you'd like to have? 
And — really, won't you stay?" 

When she had gone I sighed and said, 
" I hate to lie, 't is true ; 

But," pulling out a box of stamps, 
" It 's the only thing to do." 

(95) 



Was if Pan? 



I. 

,T was Saturday night; 

There was nothing to do ; 
The girls they were many, 
The pleasures were few. 
With dancing and callers 
Alike they were bored ; 
So in bloomers and blouse 

To the " Gym " went the horde, 
Just for fun. 



II. 



The lone Senior threw 

Her reserve quite aside ; 
The Specials to rival 

The Juniors all tried. 
The first hour was spent 

In brisk basket ball, 
And many a bruise 

Was received in that hall. 
Oh, what fun ! 



III. 

After that came leap frog, 

And then blind-man's buff, 
For soon of the jumping 

We had had quite enough. 
Next morning the lame 

And the halt and the blind 
All stayed home from church. 

Did this pay, to your mind, 
For their fun? 



(96) 



Have ^Ioa Heard— 



The Breakfast Gong? 
From the Senior play? 
Kittiebel read Browning? 
Of Ada's mother? 
Of the T. L. T. C.'s? 
"Prepare to stand"? 
The Junior yell? 
About our petition? 



Have <Joa <3een~~ 



Papers by the Peck? 
Any Senior dignity? 
Lasell girls punging? 
The Juniors play basket-ball? 



Do <Joa ¥)ho\j~ 



The Allerlei is out? 

The difference between a crane and a stork? 

Why the Allerlei worries Helene? 



(97; 



Juge. 

3. S. D. banquet. 

4. Commencement concert. 

5. Lasellia banquet. 

6. Mrs. Martin's lecture and band concert. 

7. Baccalaureate Sunday. 

8. Class Night. 

9. Senior reception. 

10. Commencement Day. 

1 1. Sad adieus. 



(98) 



September. 

15. Arrival of new girls. 

16. Classification. 

17. Lecture on Shakespeare by Mr. Sprague. 

18. Clubs convened. 

19. Porch party. 

20. Missionary meeting. 

21. Excursion to Bunker Hill. 

22. Junior Class organized. 
25. Home-sickness. 

28. Nantasket excursion. 

29. Girls caught sleeping out. 



(99) 



October. 

3. Straw ride and feast. 

7. Exhibition of photographs. 

13. Auction of papers. 

15. Mr. Stanton's lecture on Harmony. 

19. Excursion to Concord and Lexington. 

21. First Allerlei meeting. 

23. Miss Call's first lecture. 

26. Reception. 

27. Gymnasium work began. 
31. Fancy-dress ball. 



(100) 



f/ouember. 

3. Drill began. 

Chapel visitors dismissed. 

Election returns at 9. 30. 

Election parade at 12.00. 
5. Sanitation lecture by Mrs. Norton. 

10. Silence reigned supreme in Chapel, and we voted on Xmas holidays. 

1 1. Miss Preston left. 

15. Mrs. Ballington Booth spoke at the Congregational Church. 

19. Mr. Lewis spoke on Missions. 

20. Junior reception. 

21. French play. 

25. Saw Olga Nethersole. 

26. Thanksgiving. Decided not to see Willard. 



(IOI) 



D<?e<?mb<?r. 

3. Orphean concert. 

4. Skating. 
10. Reception. 

14. General house-cleaning. 
Mrs. Martin's recital. 

16. Trunks in the hall. 

Informal musical in the gymnasium. 

17. Bade farewell to the Thirteen Immortals. 



(102) 



6 

7 
1 1 

12 

14 
17 
18 

19 

20 



January. 

Depot reception. 

Arrival and list taken of those " deprived of the pleasure." 

Jubilee Singers. 

A cool letter. 

Lecture on " Marble Faun." 

Mr. Davidson spoke on the Rescue Mission. 

Senior statistics finished. 

Faculty disturbed by golf players in the hall. 

Organ recital. 



Rescue Mission. 
21. Lecture on " Romola." 
25. German play. 

27. Juniors sign a petition. 
Lecture on " Childe Harold." 

28. Day of prayer. 
30. Two sleigh-rides. 



(103) 



February. 

4. Lecture on Home Economics. 

5. Daisy received flowers from strike. 
8. Class picture taken. 

12. Auction. 

Lecture on Lincoln by Dr. Younge. 

13. Lecture on Wordsworth by Dr. Younge. 
15. School sleigh-ride to Boston. 

17. '98 beat '99 in basket ball. 

18. Special A beat Special B. 

Mr. Southwick's lecture on " Hamlet." 
22. Big dinner and Poverty Social. 
24. '98 beat Special A. 



(104) 



3. Caps, gowns, and dignity appear in Chapel. 

II. Special and prep, reception. 

13. Initiation. 

1 5. Senior talk. 

18. Luck deserted the Junior team. 

19. Went to " Hamlet." 

20. Went to " Richard III." 
27. Cooking exams. 

31. The majority of the school studied in Chapel. 



(105) 






r* 




y 




Rjites for fl)e UnderOassmen at Lasdl 

To take effect September, '97. 



I. Seniors shall always pass out of the door before under classmen. 
II. All under classmen shall remain seated until the Seniors have left the Chapel. 



III. No under classmen shall remain seated while a Senior is standing. 



IV. " Supes " enter upon duties of office in September instead of in June. 
V. Front seats shall be reserved for the Seniors at all entertainments. 
VI. At store and office hours Seniors shall always have precedence. 



(107) 



3aggestion<; for Senior Essa^S- 



E. M. BLAIR. — Natural Beauties of Seminary Grounds. 
A. G. BURDSAL. — Poker as Played at Monte Carlo. 

N. J. BURROUGHS. — A Complete Exposition of the Principles of Free Silver. 
E. H. CARLISLE. — Mysteries of the Green Room. 
G. A. Clarke. — The Art of Entertaining. 
M. M. DAVIS. —Life in the Wild West. 
I. M. Davis. — Sugar: Its Manufacture and Consumption. 
E. A. Dresser. — Modern Modes of Personal Locomotion. 
L. D. Evans. — Southern Chivalry versus Boston Discourtesy. 
M. J. FEAGLES. — The Culinary Art. 
E. Howe. — Discourse on Military Tactics. 

G. A. JONES. — Do We Choose or Accept Our Travelling Companions? 
L. M. JOSSELYN. — The New Man. 
N. F. Quirk. — ^Eschylus for Summer Reading. 
L. W. Richards. — The Last of the Richards. 

(108) 



K. Robertson. — The School I Left Behind Me. 

Z. W. ROBINSON. — Variety is the Spice of Life. 

L. SHUMWAY. — Magnetism of the Alma Mater. 

G. TAGGART. — Atalanta, the Model for the Twentieth Century Girl. 

A. P. Warner. — Life in the Great Capital. 

G. P. Washburn. — B Natural as the Key-note of Good Manners. 

A. M. Weston. — Harmony in the Home. 

A. S. YOUNG. — Ode to the Summer Man. 



(109) 



JUNIOR-TON'S ENGLISH PRIMER. 



EDITED EXPRESSLY FOR THE CLASS OF 97, 



LHSELL SEMINARY. 




What is this? This is a Sen-ior. 
Has she a big head ? Yes, she has 
a big head. What is in this 
big head? Noth-ing but wheels. 
Does she know much? She thinks 
she does. We know bet-ter. 

Sen'-ior head bet'-ter 

wheels noth'-ing thinks 



(in) 




it ft m 



=■ -■— *$.**& * 



Birds in their little nests agree. 
Do girls in Sen-ior Hall agree? 
Once they did not. What did 
they do then? They wept. 
What can the Jun-iors learn 
from this story? They can 
learn not to room in Sen- 
ior Hall. 



Jun'-iors 
a-gree' 



wept 
mor'-al 



room 
once 



(112) 




It is a love-ly win-ter day. 
Two girls are walk-ing on 
the grounds. One is a Sen-ior 
and one is a Jun-ior. What 
have they done? They have 
sinned. What, a Jun-ior sin- 
ned? No, she was led into it 
by this lit-tle Sen-ior, and 
they were caught ! 



walk'-ing 
grounds 



sinned 
caught 



win'-ter 
love'-ly 



("3) 



Mov Port one Managed It. 




• ■■ ■ .^\^^^: 



AME FORTUNE was tired to death with looking out for people's affairs. Ever since her baby- 
'/ hood, — she did not, indeed, remember her babyhood, and had even been told that she had 
never had one, but that she and her ill-favored brother, Bad Luck, had "just growed," like some 
other dark complexioned folk, a thing which she did not at all believe, not she, — ever since 
her babyhood, I say, had she been saddled with the affairs of others, who had for so long a time charged 
up to her account all the disagreeable things that befell them, that Fortune had grown sharp and sour, like 
Bad Luck ; and between the two of them the world was having a hard time of it. 

One afternoon, years ago, she sat for a long while with her brown old hands clasped together in her lap, 
and her dim eyes looking fixedly into space, trying to devise a plan whereby she might take a vacation for a 
time, and rest her aching head and weary body. Finally, she invented a scheme for ridding herself of at least 
one of her heaviest burdens, and letting the ungrateful world wag at its will awhile without her. Not that it 
made much difference ; the world wagged that way all the time, but it felt that it must have some one on whom 
to lay the blame when things went wrong, a bad habit for which Adam set the precedent long before with 
respect to a culpably hearty meal of fresh fruit. Now the particular burden which Fortune was thus planning 
to ease herself of, was Lasell Seminary ; for by the students of this school, even though they were her favorites, 
she was more severely and unreasonably blamed than by any of the rest of the world. 

"Hi '11 fix 'em!" said she. "Let'em rail hat some one helse hawhile." (It should be mentioned that 



("4) 



Fortune was something of an Anglo-maniac, and conscientiously aped the cockney in her speech.) Thus, 
though the school was really one to be bragged on, and the darling of her heart, she deliberately planned to 
play the girls a malicious trick. 

To do this she must go shopping, for materials were necessary. The mart in which she did her buying 
was in the great city of World's Work, whither she went straightway. What a bazar that was ! Here were to 
be had things worth a king's ransom, many of which she bought, for her plan demanded rich and costly stuffs. 
She could easily do this, for Fortune's purse was always full, and she might buy what pleased her fancy ; there 
was neither need nor temptation for her to do so wicked a thing as to steal, even though Mercury himself set 
the example. Yet among so great a variety of wares even so skilful a shopper as Fortune was puzzled what to 
choose, and wandered about somewhat aimlessly, it must be confessed, with her Moved sequins jingling 
musically at every step. Presently she came upon a bright-eyed and cheery-faced carpenter standing at a book- 
stall, diligently looking up in the lusty volumes an answer to the question, "When did Solomon live?" for it 
was a question of fearful and absorbing interest, and the answers to it were various and conflicting, one 
authority stating that it was before the Flood, and another that Solomon was contemporary with Columbus. 
Deeply engrossed in this task, busily cutting and thumbing over whole barrowslvX of old pamphlets, the carpenter 
hardly noticed at first the light touch of Fortune's fingers, for the dame recognized in this person an invaluable 
aid and was resolved to secure the prize. The eager searcher for knowledge was, as it proved, only too glad 
to be taken into Fortune's employ, and went along with her willingly enough. 

Her chief purchases now made, the dame gave her attention to selecting a few gew gaws to please the girls and 
keep them good-humored while she should be engaged with further working out her plan. On a table strewn with 
curious objects, and presided over by a Le Roy errand-girl from " York State," she espied an oddly-designed call-bt\\, 
which she took, knowing that in school there is nothing so useful or so diverting as a bell. A little farther on was a 
charming hurdy-gurdy, all ornamented in gold — Steinw&y pianos are not more handsome ; and she bought it in a 
twinkling for her dears. A large coQ.oa.nut next attracted her. The girls, thought she, would like that for basket-ball; 

(»5) 



it would make them careful, too; and she bought this also, so many a Lasell girl knows, and rues the day 'twas pur- 
chased. None kenned rick-rack's fascination for the feminine mind so well as Fortune, who bought great store of it, 
together with crochet-needles, and various models for Harvard cushions. Passing a small boy who had a fine 
lot of juicy plums to sell, she took all the young plummer had. Then lifting her eyes to the hills encircling the 
city, she saw day zwiting already with the treacherous evening, and bethought her that she must hasten home- 
ward with her goods. " Hall these things we must pack 'ard together," said she to the deft-handed carpenter, 
" so they '11 take hup has little space has his possible ; hand go 'ome." Which was done instanter. 

That night she and the carpenter worked till the wee small hours, constructing, of the rich and varied 
materials she had bought, an automatic machine endued with marvellous capacities, a machine which when 
properly adjusted and wound up would run, without once stopping, from September till June, and do work 
which before that time had been unattempted by any machine then in existence. Its chief value to Fortune 
was that it was an unparalleled blame-taker; indeed, growling at it seemed really to act like oil to the wheels, 
and make them fly all the faster. Next morning she gave her various gifts to the girls, who were so charmed 
with them that they paid no further heed to Fortune herself, who improved the opportunity by setting up her 
wonderful machine, and putting the carpenter in charge of it ; then dubbing the whole — attendant and machine 
— the "Faculty" a name of ominous import, she secretly left for no one knows where. 

The plan worked to a charm. From that day forth, the Faculty has borne all the blame of whatever 
goes wrong at Lasell; and when things go right, the girls take the praise for their share. Fortune has never 
since shown her face ; but there is a deep-rooted belief that she still, though secretly, takes care of Lasell, 
although she is no longer railed at because of mischances. The machine is still in working order, and the 
carpenter finds it so engrossing a charge that no time is left to discover when Solomon lived. 



(116) 



Heard Tfyroagf) ff)e Transom, 



OR 



U/I?at tl?e Editors 5aid. 



HE Chief and the Poet. — Well, it's a shame those girls can't be here on time! Here we 
have the " Poem on Election " to write before dinner, and no one shown up yet but us two con- 
genial and faithful souls. 

The Critic and the Jester {entering arm in arm) . — Hello, strikes! Where's the "Sub"? 
Sub (rushing in). — Oh! Am I late? 
Chief. — Oh, no ! Not at all ! We 've only been here an hour waiting for you, and we 're just as angry 
as we can be ! I 'm not personally angry, but — 

Recorder (entering, in gym. suit). — I couldn't get here any sooner. Just got back from gym. 
Chief. — Now, girls, we must get to work. Get out the " Engaged " sign and put up the pillow. We 
have to write that " Poem on Election," and we must get something 'cute about the editors. Oh, but first 
we must finish these Senior Statistics. Does anybody know what Ivah's pet slang is? 
Critic. — No one ever heard her use any slang ( ?) . 
Sub. — Oh, she sits at our table ! I '11 find out quick enough. 
Jester. — Isn't Norine's pet expression "darn"? 

Critic — Oh, / don't think that's a bit good. No one ever heard her say anything so moderate as 
that. 

Chief. — Well, somebody find out, and — 

Jester (showing some paper). — Girls, can't you do anything with these jokes? Now, there's one about 
Edith G. and Daisy S. chewing gum in history. 

(117) 



Chorus. — That's old! 

Chief. — Now here 's a suggestion — " Poem on our future husbands," {musingly') " husbands — 
Poet (dreamily). — '" You will never see one, but I will show you one." 

Critic. — What do you think one of the Seniors condescendingly said to me to-day ? She said, 
you put something in the Allerlei about basket-ball? It '11 help to fill up." 
Chorus. — When we turn away contributions all the time ! 

Chief. — And, oh, that reminds me. We must look over some of the contributions. 
Poet. — A Prep, handed in this to-day, saying she hoped it would meet with our approval. 
Chief (seizing it) . — Why, I believe it 's a poem. Somebody read it ! 
Recorder. — All right ! (Reads.) 

To my Darling. 



husbands," 
" Why don't 



ii. 



I love her, I love her, 
And who will dare 

To chide me for loving 
A Junior fair ? 



To buy her flowers 

Is my delight, 
And to fill her pitcher 

Every night. 



m. 



And when in chapel 
She smiles at me, 

It makes me proud 
As proud can be. 



Chorus. — That 's enough of that stuff ! What were we talking about? That Prep, ought to be hanged for 
wrecking a train of thought. 

Chief. — Here, somebody that knows how to spell, copy these statistics. 
Sub. — Are n't we going to have an editorial on the Senior play? 
Critic. — No, they can't get up a play ; they 're going to have a reading. 
Poet. — Oh, there goes the first gong ! 
Chief. — Well, we must have a meeting Saturday night. 
Recorder. — But I 'm drawn for the Symphony. 
Critic. — Yes, and I 'm going to make candy. 
Jester and Poet. — We 're going to play basket-ball. 
• Chief. — Then Willy can call. (Exeunt.) 

(118) 






-jgPlief— 1 






■**■ i't 









'■" /,.-> -- 







PECIALTIES . . . 



<*^. 



D 



I 



E S' 



Waists, 
Belts, 

Neck Dress, 
Collars and 
Cuffs. 




509 Washington Street, 



<#^ 



M 



'N, 



U 



R 



N 



I 



H 



R 



<*n. 



Cor. West, opp. R. H. White & Co.'s, 



BOSTON. 



Index. 



Allerlei Board 

Auction 

Basket Bali Teams 

Board of Trustees 

Bragdon C. C. . 

Calendar 

Canoe Club . 

Carpenter, Caroline A. 

Christian Endeavor Society 

Class History, '98 

Class History, '99 

Class History, 19CO 

Class Night 

Cooking Class 

Deutsches Theater 

Do You Know . 

Drill . 

Election Night . 

Faculty 

February 15 

Freshman Register 

Have You Heard 

Have You Seen . 

Heard through the Transom 

How Fortune Managed It 

How We Long for Senior Privileges 

In Memoriam 

Instrumental Club 

Instrumental Pupils 

Junior Register . 

Junior-ton's Primer 

La Demoiselle a Markr 



}'Ac;e 
14 
81 

75 
21 

18 
98 
63 
19 
64 
36 
42 
48 
78 

71 

82 

97 
69 

93 
23 
93 
47 
97 
97 
117 
114 

85 
54 
68 
61 

35 
no 

83 



Lasell Building . 

Lasell, Edward . 

Lasellia Banquet . 

Lasellia Members 

Lasellia Officers . 

Lasell Leaves 

Martin, Blanche C. 

Matrimonial Club 

Missionary Society 

Ninety-eight Enterprise 

Ninety-seven's Progress 

Orphean Club 

Physical Culture . 

Preparatory Register 

Rules for Under Clas^uu 

S. D. Banquet 

S. D. Membeis 

S. D. Officers 

Senior Register 

Senior Statistics 

Shakespeare Class 

Sophomore Register 

Specials 

Stranger Things Have Hdpp^ 

Studio . 

Suggestions for Senior Essa>s 

Swimming Pupils 

The Caller's Wail 

The Masquerade . 

The Part which Cues Bcfor 

The Stamp Borrower 

Was it Fan? 



PAGE 

16 
'7 

77 
58 
57 
59 
20 

79 

65 
16 
29 
66 
72 

53 
107 
76 
56 
55 
27 
88 
61 
41 

5 1 
89 

73 
108 

72 

93 
86 

'5 

95 
96 



(121) 



Index to Advertisements. 



PAGE 

Andrew, J 130 

Babb, Edward E. & Co 9 

Bent & Bush 124 

Boston & Albany Railroad . 7 

Butler, William S. & Co 131 

Carter, H. H. & Co 127 

Chartier . . . , 131 

Chickering, Elmer . . . . . . .127 

Childs, H. M 127 

Cobb, Aldrich & Co 5 

Crosby Brothers & Co. . . . . . . .124 

Crosby, C. A. W. & Son 131 

Dame, Stoddard & Kendall 128 

De Wolfe, Fiske & Co 1 

Dreka 2 

Freeman & Taylor 132 

Frost & Adams Company 127 

Hall, Martin L. & Co 124 

Hearn, Charles W 4 

Higgins, C. Lathrop 1 

Ingraham, George H 128 

Jenkins, O. A. & Co 10 

Johnson, George E 128 

Keyes, Elliot W 128 

Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railway .... 3 

Lawrence, Wilde & Co. ....... 2 



McAver, Miss S. A. 

Mudge, Alfred & Son . 

Oak Grove Creame-v Company 

Osgood 

Pierce, S. S. Company . 

Plummer, George A. & Co. 

Prior Brothers 

Putnam & Spooner 

Rand, Walter I. . 

Ransom, Mrs. M. M. . 

Schirmer, G., Jr. . 

Shepherd, William T. . 

Shreve, Crump & Low Co. 

Shuman, A. & Co. 

Springer Brothers 

Stickney & Smith 

Stowell, A. & Co. 

Sturtevant & Haley 

Swan, Newton & Co. . 

The Bouquet 

The Leading Dry Goods House of 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co. 

Ward, Samuel Company 

Wethern, George M. . 

Whitney's 

Woodland Park Hotel . 



Newton 



PAGE 

126 
126 
129 

2 
132 
132 

2 
125 
126 

1 

131 
127 

6 
123 

1 
130 

8 
130 
124 
130 
129 
130 
128 
124 

8 
123 



Alfred Mudge & Son, Printers, Boston. 



Voodknd P&rk Hold 



, 2> , 9 , 9 



This favorite hotel is situated in the beautiful village of rtuburndale, 
Mass., ten miles from (Boston, on the ^Boston and Albany Railroad. 
The City of Newton, of which rtuburndale is one of the wards, is 
celebrated for its fine and interesting drives. The location of the 
hotel is all that could be desired, and the cuisine is of a commendable 
order. Our aim is to extend that cordiality which will induce our guests 
to feel they are at home. For further particulars, address 



C. C. BUTLER, PROPRIETOR. 



SHUMAN CORNER, spring and summer, im. 

In Madras Fabrics, French and American Percales and Lawns, Zephyrs, Jacquard 
Ladies' Looms, Ginghams, Dimities, Swiss Muslins, etc., with and without Detachable 

Shift Waists , Collars, Pointed Yokes, both back and front, Bishop and Watermelon Sleeves, 

Hampden Collars, etc., $1.50, $2.00, $2.50, $3.00, $3.50, $4.00. 

Ladies' Sweaters . In all colors and combinations of shades, $6.00, $6-50. 

In Mohair, Sicilians, Alpacas, Serges, etc., all lengths, $6.00, $8.00, $10.00, 
Ladies ' $1200, $15.00, $20.00. 

Dress Skirts . . . Ladies' Bicycle Suits, Cloth and Straw Walking Hats, Chemisettes, Collars and 

Cuffs, Cuff Buttons, Belts, Buckles, etc., etc. 

A* SHUMAN & CO* Washington and Summer Streets, Boston. 

(123) 



S. B. Newton. 



C. F. Kidder. J. H. Richardson. 



SWAN, NEWTON & CO., 



DEALERS IN 



JpodtpuV/ilsl G^me, 

Live Pigeons, Smoked Tongues, etc., 

1 8 and 20 . — 

FANEUIL HALL MARKET, 



Telephone, 928 Haymarket. 



Boston. 



for fine niLLINERY visit 

GEORGE M WETHERN, 

21 and 23 Temple Place. 

Strictly First-Class Goods at Popular Prices. 

All the latest novelties in Fine Millinery are shown on our counters 
as soon as in Paris, London, or Berlin markets. Your patronage is 
respectfully solicited. 

GEORGE M. WETHERN. 

CROSBY BROTHERS & CO., 

Sole Receivers of the WINSOR CREAMERY. 

Western and Northern Creameries a specialty. 

@~ DEALERS IN © 

■gutter, C^ese and 6g£s, 

Nos. 57 and 59 QUINCY MARKET, 

And Basement 1 1 South Side Quincy Market, 

BOSTON. 



F. M. CROSBY. 
FREDERICK CROSBY 



5ENT & 



h^&tter^, "pUrrier^, 



. . AND . . 
MANUFACTURERS OF 



CAPS 

In all Shapes. 



387 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 



Martin L. Hall & Co,, 



U/tyolesale droeers, 



13 and 14 South Market, 



33 and 34 Chatham Streets, 



A. J. Adams. 
Fred. P. Virgin. 
Chas. G. Burgess 



BOSTON. 



(124) 




We don't want to buy your dry goods, 

We don't like you any more, 
You 'II be sorry when you see us 

Going to some other store. 
You can't sell us any shirt waists, 

Four-in-hands or other fads, 
We don't want to buy your dry goods 

If you won 'I give us your ads. 




I Utnam & Spnnngi*, . ♦ . SPECIALISTS, 



Brass and Iron 
Bedsteads* 



RELIABLE BEDDING of every description. 



254 



Down Quilts and Cushions. 
Linen Sheets and Pillow Slips. 
Fine Blankets. 



Telephone, 
Tremont, 1019. 

(125) 



Boylston Street, 

Third door from Church Street, 

BOSTON, 



THIS BOOK FROM OUR PRESS. 



-^ BUSHED i 




CLASS PRINTING A SPECIALTY. 



OLD GOLD and SILVER. 


Miss S. A. McAVER, 
Dressmaker, 

Rooms 28 and 29, J& 
PIERCE BUILDING, 

Copley Square, 


,„, i IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 1 


I pay the highest cash price for all kinds of 
OLD GOLD, SILVER and PLATINUM. 




WALTER L RAND, 175 Tremont Street, 
Room 10, Evans House. 


BOSTON. 



(126) 




H 



AS BEEN CHOSEN OUR CLASS PHOTOG- 
RAPHER, AND ALL STUDENTS OF LASELL 
ARE ENTITLED TO SPECIAL RATES AND 
SPECIAL ATTENTION 



cJ^jAe c=x5e(t€iivi<f ^j^'/i(pt^t€t^ifie't ) 



21 West Street, Boston. 




h£CXO Cfcl-Liitt i/> -2X0-* un< -» w oci/i • ocuif- < - _i u ex. 1/1 



EVERYTHING A Student Needs in the 

o o STATIONERY LINE. 

Fountain Pens and Engraved Cards can 
be found in the Co-operative Store of 

H. H. CARTER & CO.. 5 Somerset St. 

Discount to Students 20 per cent. 



H. M. CHIIyD8, 

. . . Dealer in . . . 

Dry and Fancy Goods, Toys, Stationery, 
Crockery, and Confectionery. 

Also AgeDcy for the American Laundry Co. Call and see Samples. 

COR. AUBURN AND LEXINGTON STREETS, AURURNDALE, MASS. 



Wm. V. ghej>herd, 



. Souvenirs of . . . 



Foreign^ *£*£ 

Srt and ^Travel 



252 iSofilston Street 



ISoston. 



(127) 



ESTABLISHED ISOO 



Toilet Articles, Dog Collars, Muzzles, Leashes, Opera Glasses, Pocket 

Books, Purses, Manicure Supplies. 

DAME, STODDARD & KENDALL, 

Table Cutlery, Scissors, Pocket Knives, Plated Ware, Fishing Tackle, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

STERLING, RELAY, EAGLE BICYCLES. 

Kodak ; Poco ; Cameras, Bull's Eye, Premo. Developing and Printing a Specialty. 

370-372-374 WASHINGTON STREET, 



Catalogue on application. 



OPPOSITE BROMFIELD STREET. 



Antiseptic Liquid Dentifrice, 

For Cleansing and Preserving the Teeth, Hardening 
the Gums, Refreshing and Imparting a Delightful 
Taste to the Mouth. j* jt jt jt <£ <£ <£ 

ELLIOT W. KEYES . . . Pharmacist, 
Auburndale Mass. 



j Do you use the Boston Papers ? Do 
| you want fine engraving ? Class In- 
|» vitations? Visiting Cards? Blank 
i Books? or anything in Stationery? 
? We have a stock of $100,000 from 
i -which to select. <£ <£ <£ <£ <£ 

SAMUEL WARD COMPANY, 

49 Franklin Street -------- Boston* 




GEORGE E. JOHNSON, 



DEALER IN 



@> Hay, Grain and F>ee<sl,|| 

LEXINGTON STREET, 

Telephone. Auburndale. 



GEORGE H. USlGRjUULJid, 

JljpothieccLry ; 



Washington and. Waltham Sts., 



WEST JSTEWTOXT. 



(128) 



This space is reserved for the Leading Dry Goods House of Newton, Mass. 



Oali Strove s£rouiiiori( Qo. 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 



FINE DAIRY PRODUCTS. 



Pure Milk and Cream delivered 
. . in Glass Jars. . . 



Specialties in Milk and Cream, Fresh Churned Butter, Fresh Laid Eggs, Domestic 
and Imported Cheese, Ice Cream and Ices of all flavors, and Fancy Fruit Ices. . 

Our famous Lunch Boom for Ladies and Gentlemen, adjoining and connected with our Boylston Street Creamery, has been 
recently enlarged and perfectly equipped. The best of everything the market affords, well-cooked, perfectly served and at reasona- 
ble prices, can always be found there. 

The Oak Grove Creamery ICE CREAM is used by a great many private families in Boston and suburbs, and is considered the best that 
can be obtained. When ordering your Ice Cream do not fail to leave your order at our Creamery, 445 BOYLSTON STREET. 
We make all kinds of Creams, Ices, Fancy Creams, Fancy Moulds and Fruit Ices. 

Especial rates to parties buying in large quantities. All orders by mail or messenger will receive prompt attention. 

*±*i5 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON, MHSS. 

N. L. MARTIN. BRANCHES: 430 and 1310 Massachusetts Avenue, CAMBRIDGE. 

(129) 



STURTEVANT & HALEY, 



Beef and Supply Company, 



38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 



BOSTON 



Beef, :E*o:z»l£-, Lard, Hams, 

AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

Established 1826. Incorporated 1891. 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION. 



Ladies 



Special 
Attention 
given to 
Mourning- 
Orders. 



Wishing to purchase Correct Styles in 

Millinery^ 



at Lowest Prices , should call at 
THE BOUQUET, 134 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 



Qollege Trade a Specialty. 

LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 

J. ANDREW'S SHOE PARLOR, 

145 A Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 

High-grade regular goods and samples at low prices. Take elevator. 




STICKNEY&SMITH, 



Ladies' and Misses' 

GARMENTS, 
TAILOR MADE SUITS, 
BICYCLE SUITS, 

SHIRT WAISTS, 
And FURS. 



Fur Garments Altered and Repaired 
at very reasonable prices. 

No. 134 Boylston St., near the Old Public Library, 

BOSTON. 



JF YOU DRAW OR PA INT, 

PURCHASE YOUR SUPPLIES OF 

Drawing Papers, Fine Colors for Oil, Water, 

China and Tapestry Painting, Brushes, 

Easels, Sketch Boxes, Scales, 

Triangles, Curves, T Squares, 

Drafting Instruments, and 

Artists' Materials 

OF ALL KINDS, 

From the Manufacturers, 

WADSWORTH, HOWLAND & CO. 

(Incorporated.) 

82 and 84 Washington Street, 

and Grundmann Studios, Clarendon Street, 

BOSTON. 

Factories, MALDEN, MASS. 



(I30) 



Trimmed Hats for. 



Young Ladies. 



p $ 



tjr* t2r* fir* 



^VtTJVI. S. JBXJTXvK^R «& oo. 



90 to 98 Tremont Street 



BOSTON. 



GK SCHIEMEE, Tx. 

(THE BOSTON MUSIC CO.) 



MUSIC 



26 West Street, 



IMPORTERS, 
PUBLISHERS, 
DEALERS . . . 

BOSTON, MASS. 



We carry the finest and most complete stock of foreign and American 
Sheet Music and Music Books in the country. All orders filled promptly 
and at the lowest current rates, and accounts opened. 

Music Teachers' Vade Mecum and General Catalogue sent gratis to any 
address. Music sent " on selection " to all parts of the country. 

Attention is called to the new editions of operas in vocal score of Faust, 
Tannhauser, Carmen, Romeo and Juliette, etc., price $1.50; same elegantly 
hound in cloth, price $2.50. 

Send your address to us, and we will forward, monthly, our new and 
extensive bulletin of new foreign and American publications, together with 
a complete review of current events of the musical world. 

CUSTOMARY REFERENCES REQUIRED. 



%zmzlzxs and jiitojemmtit! 



C. A. W. Crosby. 
John D. Crosby. 



Washington and Avon Streets, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



TELEPHONE NO. IS. 



CHARTIBR 



151 and 152 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 



Visit our assortment of 

Ladies' Tailor-made Suits, Imported Jackets, Silk 
and Shirt Waists, and Foreign Dress-goods. 

For Price and Style are Unequalled in the City. 



(131) 



GBO. A. PLUMMER & CO 



531 AND 533 WASHINGTON STREET. 



LADIES' CLOAKS, SUITS, 
WAISTS, FURS, 

MACKINTOSHES AND CRAVENETTE CARMENTS. 

We Make a Specialty of Young Ladies' Garments on our SECOND FLOOR, 



Having always in stock the LATEST DESIGNS 
and STYLES at POPULAR PRICES. 



4®= Next Door to Boston Theatre. =®jr 



WATCHES, 
JEWELRY, 



DIAMONDS, 
SILVERWARE. 



We make a specialty of fine Jewelry and Silverware. 

Our Stock of 

SILVER NOVELTIES, 

POCKET-BOOKS, 

OPERA GLASSES, ETC., 

is well selected, and our prices are lower than any other first- 
class store in Boston. 

Watch and Jewelry Repairing; promptly attended to. 

Freeman & Taylor, 



495 WASHINGTON ST., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



LONDON MIXTURE 

BREAKFAST TEAS, 




Sl.OO per Pound. 



S. S. Pierce Co. 

IMPORTERS AND GROCERS, 
TREMONT BUILDING, 

Cor. Tremont and Beacon Streets, 

COPLEY SQUARE, 

CENTRAL WHARF, 



BOSTON. 



COOLIDGE'S CORNER 



BROOKLINE. 



( r 3 2 ) 




mm 










to. pi 



™ S %8S 




w.< 



H 






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